Tagged: Roy White

Happy Birthday, Billy Conigliaro

BIlly ConigliaroHappy Birthday to Billy Conigliaro, the younger brother of Tony Conigliaro and an outfielder for the Red Sox, Brewers and A’s during a career that went from 1969 to 1973. I faced Billy for the first time in his third week as a major leaguer. It was April 28, 1969 and the Red Sox were playing at Yankee Stadium. Billy was a good hitter and had a lot of potential power, but in that game he went 0-for-3. I remember the game. We won 1-0. I pitched a three-hitter. Ray Jarvis, Boston’s starter, only gave up four hits, but two of them – a single by Bobby Murcer followed by Roy White’s RBI double – enabled us to win.

Happy Birthday, Andy Messersmith

Andy MessersmithHappy Birthday to former Yankee pitcher Andy Messersmith, who is 70 today. Bluto was a great pitcher, and his challenge to the reserve clause helped pave the way for ballplayers to determine their own destiny. I was gone by the time free agency came to be, but I sure remember Bluto as a dominating pitcher for the California Angels, and later for the Los Angeles Dodgers. I was the Yankees starting pitcher on August 12, 1968, the first time Bluto pitched against the team he rooted for as a kid in Toms River, New Jersey. I gave up a run in the second, and we took the lead off Mickey Mantle’s two-run homer in the sixth. Rick Reichardt tied it up with a sacrifice fly in the bottom of the sixth. With the score still tied 2-2 in the bottom of the eighth, Ralph Houk brought in Lindy McDaniel to pitch after I surrendered two-out singles to Jim Fregosi and to Rick. In the ninth, Bill Robinson hit a leadoff double, and moved to third when Tommy Tresh bunted safely. With the score tied, no outs, and runners on first and third, Bill Rigney pulled starter George Brunet and brought Bluto in to pitch. Bluto have up an RBI single to Jake Gibbs, putting us ahead, 3-2. He got Bobby Cox to fly out to Don Mincher at first, and struck out Lindy. Then Roy White drove Tommy home with a single. That was it for Bluto. We won 5-2.

I pitched against him again during his first visit to Yankee Stadium two weeks later. It was a Monday night doubleheader and I started the first game against Dennis Bennett. We fell behind in the fourth when that Reichardt guy hit an RBI single for the first run of the game. I tied it up in the bottom of the inning when I hit a sacrifice fly to Rick in left, scoring Tommy. We took the lead in the sixth when Dick Howser hit a two-out double, scoring Bobby Cox. That’s when Andy came in to pitch. He got Bill Robinson out to end the inning. The Mick led off the seventh with a single, and moved to second on Heeba’s single. Andy Kosco bunted The Mick to third and Heeba to second. Bluto struck out Tommy, but then gave up a two-RBI double to Frank Fernandez. After walking Bobby intentionally, I got up to bad with two outs and runners on first and second. I belted a double past that Reichardt guy, scoring Frank and Bobby. We won 6-2.

In the second game, which I got to see most of — The Major didn’t believe in sending guys home early – starter Bill Harrelson loaded the bases and with two out, Andy came in to pitch again. Mickey Mantle came up to pinch hit for Charley Smith, and Bluto struck him out. We lost that game; Andy got the save.

Monument Monday: Larry Gowell

LARRY GOWELLLarry Gowell was only with the Yankees for a brief time during the 1972 season, but that was enough for him to achieve a sort of immortality in the baseball history books.  It was October 4, 1972 and we were at Yankee Stadium playing the Brewers.  Larry was the leadoff hitter in the bottom of the third and smacked a double off Jim Lonborg that went past John Briggs in left.  Larry was left stranded on second as the next three Yankees failed to drive him home.  But the hit was historic because it was the last game of the season, and as it turned out, he was the last American League pitcher to get a hit before the Designated Hitter rule went into effect the following April.  So Larry’s bat now has a place at Cooperstown.

Thanks to the leadership of CBS (sarcasm intended here), the Yankees got the #1 draft pick in 1967, the third year Amateur Draft.  Larry was their first pick in the fourth round – Ron Blomberg was the #1 pick in the first round.  The first time I saw Larry pitch was the first exhibition game of the 1970 season.  He had a natural slider and his fast ball was as fast as any other Yankee in spring training.  We were Pompano Beach playing the Washington Senators and Larry came in to pitch in the ninth inning.  We were ahead, 6-5.  I think he was a little nervous.  His first batter was Del Unser and he hit him with the pitch.  His second batter was a teenager named Jeff Burroughs, who hit a massive Home Run.

Larry spent the 1972 season with the West Haven Yankees, the Eastern League AA club that was being managed by the Bobby Cox, now a Hall of Fame manager.  He was on fire and the Yankee pitchers were following him closely.  In 26 games, he was 14-6 with a 2.54 ERA and 171 strikeouts in 181 innings.

Larry was a September call-up at a time when the Yankees were in a four-way race for First Place in the AL East.  He made his major league debut in the bottom of the sixth inning on September 21, at County Stadium.  With the Brewers ahead 4-0, Ralph Houk had removed Freddy Beene the previous inning for a pinch hitter, Rusty Torres.  Larry retired the first three major league batters he faced: John Briggs, Ollie Brown and Mike Ferraro.  Then in the seventh, he did the same thing against Rick Auerbach, Jerry Bell (the pitcher), and Ron Theobald.  With two outs, The Major took him out in the eighth so Felipe Alou could hit.  Felipe singled, the beginning of a Yankee rally.  He moved to second on Horace Clarke’s hit, and scored on Roy White’s hit.  The Bobby Murcer hit an RBI single, reducing Milwaukee’s lead to one run.  Unfortunately, Bloomie flied out to end the inning, leaving Roy and Bobby on base.  The Brewers wound up beating us, 6-4, and we wasted a rare ninth inning homer by Bernie Allen.

October 4 was the last game of the season and we had lost four in a row, dropping us to 4th place, 6 ½ games behind the Detroit Tigers.  Since we were out of contention, The Major decided to give Larry the start.   He pitched really, really well.  He gave up his first major league hit in the second to Joe Lahoud, and Briggs hit a sacrifice fly to center, scoring Dave May, who had doubled.  With the Yankees trailing 1-0 in the bottom of the sixth inning, no outs and Jerry Kenney on first, The Major pulled Larry for a pinch hitter, Frank Tepedino.  Larry had given up three hits, and had struck out six.  It was an amazing demonstration of pitching for a rookie.    We lost 1-0, as the Yankee bats were not coming through.

Larry was in contention for a major league roster spot in 1973.  He was cut at the end of spring training, losing out to Casey Cox and Doc Medich.  He didn’t make the team again in 1974; the new manager, Bill Virdon, seemed to judge him based on one bad tenth inning in an exhibition game against the Texas Rangers.  A lot of the hype that spring was about Mike Pazik, a cocky southpaw from Holy Cross who wound up getting traded to the Twins for Dick Woodson.  But Larry Gowell’s time as a MLB pitcher was indeed memorable and historic.  I am glad to have known him.

Monument Monday is a weekly tribute to the Pitchers  I knew during my baseball career.  Click here to read my previous entries.

Happy Birthday, Vida Blue

Vida BlueHappy Birthday to Vida Blue, a six-time All-Star who pitched in the major leagues for seventeen years and won the American League Cy Young and MVP in 1971. He was an amazing southpaw and I always enjoyed watching him pitch – except when he was up against me. I remember the first time I saw him. It was July 29, 1969 at the Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum. This was his second major league game and he was starting against Stan Bahnsen. He pitched perfect baseball for the first three innings. He gave up a double to Bill Robinson in the fourth and a single to Bobby Murcer in the fifth, but otherwise the Yankees were having trouble hitting this guy. He gave up two hits and two runs in the sixth, and no hits in the seventh. In the eighth, Vida walked Robinson and then have up a Home Run to Joe Pepitone. That put the Yankees ahead, 4-3. The A’s came back in the eighth, with a single by Rick Monday, a triple by Ramon Webster and a single by Bob Johnson to take a 6-4 lead.

I remember another game during the summer of 1971, a real pitcher’s duel between Vida and Mel Stottlemyre. Both of them pitched complete games. Vida had ten strikeouts, Mel pitched a three-hitter. The Yankees scored one run in the first, off a single by Thurman Munson and a double by Roy White; Tugboat scored on a ground out by Felipe Alou, and the Yankees won it 1-0.

Happy Birthday, Pete Ward

Pete WardHappy Birthday to Pete Ward, my teammate on the Yankees in 1970.  Pete came up through the Orioles organization and made his MLB debut with them in 1962. In early 1963, the Orioles traded him – along with future Yankee Ron Hansen, Hoyt Wilhelm and Dave Nicholson to the White Sox for Luis Aparicio and Al Smith.  I remember the trade well because this was the winter before I signed with the Yankees and was still a college student rooting for the White Sox.  I couldn’t believe they had traded Aparicio.  Six years and 96 Home Runs later, Chicago traded Wagon to the Yankees for Mickey Scott.  He was going to be the new First Baseman, after the Yankees traded Joe Pepitone to Houston for Curt Blefary, but the Yankees wound up going with Danny Cater. The Yankees purchased Ron Hansen’s contract from the White Sox a few weeks later, thinking he could be the answer for their Third Base problem.  I wrote a lot about Wagon in my book, including the time he hit a Home Run off Nolan Ryan during the Mayor’s Trophy Game against the Mets the season after they won the World Series.  I never had much trouble with Wagon: he had a career .190 average against me.   One game he did very well in was on July 16, 1970, the second game of a Twi-Night Doubleheader at Yankee Stadium against the Oakland A’s.  The Yankees won 4-1 and Wagon drove in three of the runs off of starter Diego Segui.  The first was a single that scored Roy White and the second was a double that scored Roy and Curt.

Happy Birthday, Hank Allen

Hank AllenHappy Birthday to Hank Allen, who played for the Senators, Brewers and White Sox from 1966 to 1973.  The Yankees opened the season at D.C. Stadium with President Lyndon Johnson throwing out the first pitch.  Mel Stottlemyre pitched opening day and the Yankees won.  I was the pitcher in the second game, and this was the first time I saw Dick Allen’s little brother.  The problem for me was that I didn’t make it to his At-Bat.  I gave up an RBI triple to Frank Howard in the first, and had a much worse second inning.  I have up five runs and Jim Bouton came in to replace me.  I had to wait until August 27, when the Yankees returned to Washington, to actually throw a pitch to Hank.  It was the bottom of the first with two outs and runners on second and third; he grounded out to Charley Smith at third to end the inning.  After getting a leadoff walk against me in the fourth, he flew out to Roy White in right in the sixth and I struck him out in the eighth.  The Yankees won 8-2.  Hank had a lifetime .269 average against me; that was higher than his brother, Dick, whose career average was .250 off my pitching.  I never faced the third Allen brother, Ron, who played only in the National League.

Happy Birthday, Bill Zepp

Bill ZeppHappy Birthday to Bill Zepp, who made his major league debut on August 12, 1969 as a pitcher for the Minnesota Twins. The Yankees were ahead 10-3 in the bottom of the eighth when Bill took the mound in relief of Jim Kaat. He got Roy White, Bobby Murcer and Thurman Munson out in his 1-2-3 inning at Yankee Stadium. Bill was an okay pitcher; in 1970, he was 9-4 with a 3.22 ERA. I remember him having some real testicular fortitude. After just one full season in the majors, he refused to sign a contract extension and said he would either play for his hometown team, the Detroit Tigers, or retire. He got the trade. But he only lasted less than half the season before an injury ended his career.