Tagged: Ray Barker

Happy Birthday, Cap Peterson

Cap PetersonFor the first four years of my career, I was one of two Peterson’s to play major league baseball. I want to remember the life of Cap Peterson, no relation, who played for the Giants, Senators and Indians during his eight year career. When I first came up with the Yankees, Cap was with the Giants. I met him in 1967, after San Francisco traded him for Mike McCormick. Cousin Cap was really tough on me in his first few plate appearances. It was April 12, 1967 at D.C. Stadium and I was matched up with Joe Coleman. I got jammed up in the first inning, when Frank Howard hit a two-out RBI triple, followed by me walking Cap. Fortunately I got Ken Harrelson to fly out. The second inning – my last one – was worse. After successive errors by Shortstop John Kennedy and First Baseman Ray Barker, I walked the pitcher to load the bases. Then I walked Ed Brinkman. Fred Valentine drove in two runs with a single to left. After intentionally walking Hondo, Cap drove in two more runs with a double to center. Jim Bouton came in relief, walked Harrelson, and Ken McMullen hit a grand slam Home Run. We lost 10-4. Cap hit a double in his next at bat against me a few weeks later, but he ended up with a .211 career average against me. Tragically, Cap died in 1980 of kidney disease at age 37. He would have been 73 today.

Monument Monday: Steve Barber

Steve BarberSteve Barber was a southpaw who amassed some strong numbers as a young pitcher for the Baltimore Orioles in the early 1960’s.   He played during some of the Orioles lean years, before the emergence of future stars like Jim Palmer and Boog Powell and the trade for Frank Robinson.  I was in college when I first started following him, and was honored to become his teammate several years later.  He was a genuinely nice guy.  The story I heard is that the Yankees saw him for the first time during a 1960 spring training game in Miami where he struck out Mickey Mantle three times.  Steve had pitched AA ball in 1959 (his mentor was a young minor league manager named Earl Weaver), but he had such an impressive spring that he made the major league team.  He went 10-7 in 27 starts for the Orioles in 1960, and really broke out in 1961 when he went 18-12, with 14 complete games and 150 strikeouts.  In 1962, Steve was on active duty in the U.S. Army; the Army gave him weekend passes to pitch, and while he started just 19 games, he had a 9-6 record.  His best year was in 1963, when he went 20-13 with 150 strikeouts and made the American League All-Star team.  That turned out to be his career year; he was 9-13 in 1964, 15-10 in 1965, and 10-5 in 1966 (when he was again named to the AL All-Star team).   Steve developed tendinitis in his elbow, which forced him to miss the All-Star game, and the World Series.

Steve was 4-9 in fifteen starts for Baltimore in 1967 when he was traded to the Yankees on July 4 for Ray Barker, some cash, and a player to be named later – eventually this would be two minor league prospects who never made the majors, Chester Trail and Daniel Brady.  His first start in Pinstripes was on July 8, against the Orioles at Memorial Stadium; he gave up six runs in 3 1/3 innings and his old team went on to beat his new team, 12-5.  I still remember the look on his face when Ralph Houk went out to the mound to take him out of the game.  Unfortunately, in baseball not every story turns out well.  He started seventeen games for the Yankees that season and went 6-9.  He was 6-5 in nineteen starts in 1968.   Clearly his best years were over. His elbow problems were not going away.

One of the things that always impressed me about Steve was his perseverance.  As a former two-time All-Star and 20-game winner, he took a demotion to the minor leagues in 1968 and played for the Syracuse Chiefs.  The Seattle Pilots took him in the 1969 expansion draft; he was 4-7 in sixteen starts for them.  Released by the Brewers during 1970 spring training, Steve refused to give up.  He cobbled together another five years in the majors (and at times, in the minors) for the Cubs, Braves, Angels and Giants.  He had a nice career: 121-106, with 950 strikeouts.

I heard that in his later years, he volunteered driving a school bus for special needs kids.  Not surprising, considering how good a person he was.  I was saddened when I learned eight years ago that he had passed away and I’ll always appreciate the privilege of being his teammate.

Monument Monday is a weekly tribute to the Pitchers  I knew during my baseball career.  Click here to read my previous entries.

Happy Birthday, Don Lock

Don LockHappy Birthday to Don Lock, an outfielder who came up through the Yankee farm system and played MLB for the Senators, Phillies and Red Sox in the 1960’s.  The Yankees traded him to the Senators in 1962 for Dale Long and he made his MLB for Washington that season.  I faced Don twice in my career, both times in my rookie season.  On July 8, 1966, we were playing the second game of a Sunday doubleheader at Yankee Stadium.  I remember the game largely because of how badly it started.  It was also the day I learned what a great baseball mind Gil Hodges, the Senators’ manager, had.   Fred Valentine led off the first inning with a bunt to me and made it safely to first.   Then Ken Hamlin bunted again to me; I got him out at first but now had a runner on second.  I’m already in a jam.  Ken Harrelson hit an RBI double, followed by Frank Howard’s RBI triple.  Don was the next batter; I got him and Ken McMullen out.

The second inning went poorly too.  Ed Brinkman singled and moved to second when I walked Jim Hannan, the pitcher; he scored on Hamlin’s double.  Hannan scored when I threw a wild pitch.  Now we are down 4-0.   Lock came up again the third inning and singled to Joe Pepitone in right.  With two outs, Don took a big lead off first and I picked him off – threw it to Ray Barker at first, who threw it to Bobby Richardson at second, and then back to Ray, who easily tagged Don to end the inning.   The Yankees came back, incrementally, starting with Mickey Mantle’s Home Run in the bottom of the third.  We won the game 8-5.  I pitched a complete game for the eighth win of my fledgling baseball career.

The game I remember most: July 4, 1966

I pitched in 355 major league baseball games over an 11-year career – 2,218 1/3 innings, I gave up 2,217 hits, 947 runs, 173 Home Runs, and I struck out 1,015 batters.  I’m blessed by a multitude of memories.  But when people ask me what game I remember most, there is nothing to think about.  It was July 4, 1966, the second game of an Independence Day doubleheader at Yankee Stadium.  I was a 24-year-old rookie and a starting pitcher for the greatest sports team in the history of the planet.  And as I took the mound for the start of the 8th inning, I was throwing a perfect game.  I had retired the first 21 batters.  I struck out Tommie Agee twice.  I don’t mean to sound arrogant, put I had great stuff.  In the first seven innings, home plate umpire Jim Odom had only called 13 balls.

We were playing the White Sox, the team I rooted for as a kid growing up in Chicago.  My guys were making some great plays in the field.  This was the day Ralph Houk ended his experiment of playing Tommy Tresh at third and Clete Boyer at sort.  Thank god; Tommy and Clete were amazing.  And the Yankee offense came through.  I led off the third inning with a single to left off Juan Pizarro, and scored on Bobby Richardson’s double.  Lou Clinton drove in Bobby and Dick Schofield to put us up 3-0.  We scored two more runs in the fifth when Jake Gibbs drove in Lou and Clete Boyer.

There were some hairy moments, like in the fourth inning when Don Buford almost beat out a bunt.  (Thank you, Clete Boyer!) and in the sixth when a relatively new Yankee, Dick Schofield, made an incredible back-handed stop at short that prevented Ken Berry from getting what should have been a bit.

So, to paraphrase Dickens, it was the best of times and it was the worst of times.  In the dugout, no one said anything, except for pitching coach Jim Turner (a Yankee legend, but not my favorite coach), who just told me to “relax.”  Gene Freese led off the 8th with a shot to left field – deep left field – that was caught magnificently by Tommy.  I had now retired 22 batters – five outs away from pitching the first perfect game since Don Larsen in the 1956 World Series.   But no immortality for me; this is where the universe turned.  Jerry Adair came to the plate – the same Jerry Adair who would have a .167 batting average against me.  Jerry hits – maybe it’ better if I say taps – the ball about twenty feet up the third base side of the mound.  I got it, and threw it high to Ray Baker at first base.  E-1, a throwing error – my throwing error – and for the first time a White Sox player had reached first base.  So no perfect game, but still a no-hitter.  Everything’s gonna be fine.

The great Ralph Houk reacts to John Romano breaking up my no-hitter in the 8th inning.

The great Ralph Houk reacts to John Romano breaking up my no-hitter in the 8th inning.

The next batter was John Romano, the White Sox catcher.  Before you ask, John would wind up with a .250 average against me – for those who don’t particularly enjoy math, that means he gets a hit one out of every four times.  And this, my friends, would be one of them.  John hit a single right up the middle.  Nothing we could do about it.  The no-hitter was off the table; now the Chisox have runners on first and second, and we still needed to win this game.  Berry gets up and hits a double to left, and Adair scored.  Al Weis, who pinch-ran for Romano, moved to third.  Then Lee Elia hits a sacrifice fly to center; Weis scored (Yankees 5, White Sox 2).  Next up was Bill Skowron, a true Yankee legend, who was pinch hitting. Moose hit a grounder to first baseman Ray Barker, who flipped it to me to get the third out in the most memorable inning of my life.  I led off the ninth with a groundout — kudos to The Major, who didn’t pinch hit for me on this incredible day.  The Yankees won – yeah, I know, that’s what matters – and I have one heck of a story to tell.   Thank you for listening to it, and Happy Fourth of July.

Happy Birthday, Casey Cox

Casey Cox Happy Birthday to Casey Cox, my Yankee teammate in 1972 and 1973.  We were part of the Class of 1966 of American League pitchers making their major league debut; he was with the Washington Senators.  The first time we pitched against each other was on July 8, 1966 at Yankee Stadium, the second game of a twilight doubleheader.  This wasn’t exactly a battle of the titans; it was a match up of two fairly crappy teams; the ’72 Yankees were in 8th place, 19 ½ games out, and the Senators were in 9th, 21 ½ games out.

I had given up two runs in the first (including a double to Ken Harrelson and a triple to Frank Howard) and two more in the second.  We picked up three runs in the third off Mickey Mantle’s Home Run, doubles by Joe Pepitone and Ray Barker, and a single by Horace Clarke.  Casey relieved Joe Hannan in the fifth inning after Mickey singled to left and Hector Lopez (pinch running for Mickey) moved to third on Joe Pepitone’s single.  Elston Howard came to bat and hit into a double play, but Hector scored and the game was tied 4-4.  With two outs, Ray hit a deep shot to center – for a moment I thought it was going out – but Don Lock caught it and the inning was over.  Casey pitched again in the sixth, a 1-2-3 inning.  I came up with two outs and Casey struck me out – not an amazing accomplishment, but memorable to me nonetheless since it was a tie game.  I’m glad Ralph Houk didn’t pinch hit for me.

The top of the seventh was no good for me.  Paul Casanova led off with a single, and moved to second on a beautiful sacrifice bunt by Ed Brinkman.  Gil Hodges, the Senators manager, pulled Casey so that Bob Saverine could pinch hit.  Good move.  Bob singled to center and Paul scored and we’re now losing 5-4.  But my team continued to come through.  The new Washington pitcher, Dick Bosman, walked Tom Tresh; Bobby Richardson got to first base on a fielding error by Brinkman, the shortstop, with Tommy moving to second.  Hector executed a pretty good sacrifice bunt, moving Tommy to third and Bobby to second.  Hodges called for an intentional walk to Pepitone, loading the bases.  Elston Howard popped up to first; then Ray Barker hit a two-out single, with Tommy and Bobby scoring.  Now we’re ahead 6-5.  We scored one more run in the eighth when Clete Boyer hit a leadoff triple and later scored.  Dick Bosman got the loss and I was now 8-5, with another complete game but just two strikeouts.

Casey came to the Yankees on August 31, 1973 in a trade for Jim Roland, ending Jim’s four-month career in pinstripes.  He was a very good guy who had the misfortune of pitching for some bad teams – he originally signed with the Reds; timing is everything in baseball.  I’m sorry to report that the Yankees lost all five games Casey pitched in, including an excruciating loss in a game I pitched against the Red Sox; the loss was entirely on me, not Casey.  In 1974, Casey pitched in one game – he entered in the sixth, with the Red Sox ahead 12-5, and gave up three runs in three innings.  The Yankees released him soon after that, and he never pitched in the major leagues again.

A few more things about the baseball career of Casey Cox: he was managed by three baseball greats – Gil Hodges, Ted Williams and Ralph Houk; he had his career year in 1969 when he was 12-7 with a 2.78 ERA, making 13 starts in 52 games; and some excellent hitters like Carlton Fisk and Rod Carew had .143 career batting averages against him.

The other thing I think about when I remember Casey Cox is that he wore #29 and if you follow Yankee history, you know that there is not much longevity associated with guys who wear #29 on the back of their pinstripes.  Of the 55 Yankees who have worn #29, the only one to last more than a few seasons were Francisco Cervelli, Mike Stanton, Gerald Williams, Catfish Hunter, and Charlie Silvera.  Casey originally wore #39, but he wanted #29, which was his number on the Senators and the Rangers.  That switch came about because Sudden Sam McDowell, who was #39, wanted #48.  Before Sudden Sam, the number was worn by a succession of one-season guys: Wade Blasingame (1972), Jim Hardin (1971), Mike McCormick (1970), Rocky Colavito (1968), Bill Henry (1966), Bobby Tiefenauer (1965), Mike Jurewicz (1965), Tom Metcalf (1963), Hal Brown (1962), Earl Torgeson (1961), Duke Maas (1961), and Hal Stowe (1960).  After Casey was traded, #29 was assigned to Tom Buskey, who wore it from April 1973 until April 1974, when he and I were traded to Cleveland; and then Dick Woodson for the rest of that season.  Then Catfish came in 1975.  Later came short-term Yankees like Dave Collins, Paul Zuvella, Al Holland, Luis Aquayo, Dave LaPoint, Mike Humphreys, Ricky Bones, Bubba Trammel, Tony Clark, Tim Redding, Felix Escalona, Octavio Dotel, Kei Igawa, Cody Ransom, Xavier Nady, Anthony Claggett, and Rafael Soriano.  So the best I can say is Good Luck to David Carpenter.

Happy Birthday, Don Demeter

Happy Birthday to Don Demeter, an 11-year MLB veteran who must have liked me because he had a lifetime batting average of .417 against me. He first showed his dominance over me at the plate early in my rookie season. It was May 17, 1966 and the Yankees were playing the Tigers in Detroit. We had a good first inning: Denny McClain walked three consecutive batters, and we scored two runs on a sacrifice fly by Roger Maris and a single by Roger Repoz. But that would be the end of the Yankee run production for the day; Denny settled down to pitch a two-hitter with eight strikeouts. After a Maris double and an intentional walk to Elston Howard in the fourth, no other Yankee would get on base.

As for me, I pitched okay for the first four innings, but let’s just say I was no Denny McClain. I had a 1-2-3 first, and after giving up a second inning double to Al Kaline, I got the next three guys out. The next two innings were fine. I gave up a fifth inning leadoff homer to Bill Freehan, followed by Ray Oyler’s double. Oyler scored on a sac fly, tying the game at 2-2. In the sixth, Norm Cash doubled, and then Don Demeter came up. He hit a powerful shot over the left field fence, putting the Tigers ahead, 4-2. Ray Barker pinch hit for me in the seventh. The Tigers won 7-2, putting my rookie record at 2-3. During our next series against Detroit, Don homered off me too, but this time the Yankee offense came through and we won 6-3.

Finally, Happy Birthday to Mike Stanley and Bob Shirley, who played for the Yankees long after I left — that means they’re much younger than me!