Tagged: Marcelino Lopez

Happy Birthday, Norm Siebern

Norm SiebernHappy Birthday to Norm Siebern, a former New York Yankee, who played major league baseball from 1956 to 1968.  Norm came up through the Yankee organization and was part of a trade that would have historic significance to the Yankees and to the game of baseball.  After the 1959 season, the Yankees traded Siebern, Hank Bauer, Don Larsen and Marvelous Marv Throneberry to the Kansas City Athletics for Roger Maris, Joe DeMaestri and Kent Hadley.   Norm later played for the Orioles, Giants, Angels and Red Sox.  He has two World Series rings –with the Yankees (1956 and 1957) – and played in the 1967 World Series with the Red Sox.   I faced Norm for the first time during my rookie season.  It was May 7, 1966 and we were playing the Angels at Anaheim Stadium.  Marcelino Lopez was pitching for California and Norm was at First Base.  I’ll never forget it; I had been in the majors for about three weeks, and I was pitching really, really well.  In the first four innings, I retired the first twelve batters.  Yes, I was pitching a perfect game.  Then in the fifth, Rick Reichardt hit a leadoff triple to Mickey Mantle in center. I got Jackie Warner out.  Then Norm comes up to bat and hit single to left, scoring Rick.  I threw a complete game and got the win, and Norm drove I the only run California scored that day.

Happy Birthday, Gary Waslewski

GARY WASLEWSKIHappy Birthday to Gary Waslewski, who pitched with me on the New York Yankees in 1970 and 1971.  I started following Gary when he was called up by the Red Sox during the summer of 1967 after seven seasons in the minor leagues because I followed a lot of young pitchers, especially when they were pitching for your greatest rival.  And I was glued to the television set on October 11, 1967 when he was picked to start Game 6 of the World Series.  (I admit I was not rooting for him – I could never root for Boston to win anything!)  With just 42 innings of major league experience in only 12 MLB games, Gary did just fine.  Boston had a 3-2 lead when he left the mound in the top of the sixth inning after walking Roger Maris and Tim McCarver.  The Red Sox beat the Cardinals 8-4, forcing the historic Game 7.

The first time I saw Gary pitch was on May 10, 1968 at Yankee Stadium.  He pitched a complete game, striking out six, but the Yankees won 2-1.   After that season, Boston traded him to the Cardinals for Dick Schofield; six months later, St. Louis sent him to the Expos for Mudcat Grant.  The Yankees got him a little less than a year later for Dave McDonald.  Joe Verbanic got optioned to Syracuse to make room for him.  Gary’s first game in Pinstripes was on May 19, 1970 at Yankee Stadium.  He came in relief for John Cumberland.  A month later, he started a game against the Red Sox, pitched well, and the Yankees won 3-2.

The first time Gary came in to pitch in relief for me was on July 9, 1970 at Memorial Stadium in Baltimore.  I had a 5-2 lead going into the bottom of the fifth, but gave up three runs on singles by Bobby Grich, Frank Robinson, Boog Powell, and a double by Brooks Robinson.  That’s when Ralph Houk took me out.  Gary came in with two outs and a runner on second and got Davey Johnson to ground out.  We took the lead in the top of the sixth when Marcelino Lopez walked Horace Clarke with the bases loaded, and then gave up an RBI single to Jerry Kenney.  We beat the Orioles 7-5.

The Yankees released Gary at the end of Spring Training 1972 and he pitched for the Oakland A’s after that.

Happy Birthday, Hector Lopez

Hector LopezHappy Birthday to my teammate, Hector Lopez, whose magnificent career as a major league baseball player crossed with mine for just one year.  His final season came in 1966, my rookie year.  I am fortunate to have had the opportunity to play with this Yankee great.  Headley started out, as many Yankees did, with the Kansas City Athletics.  He came to New York in a 1959 trade and retired there seven years later.  I met Headley for the first time during Spring Training 1966 in Fort Lauderdale.

The first game Hector and I played in together was on May 22, 1966, the second game of a Sunday doubleheader at Yankee Stadium against the Minnesota Twins.    I wasn’t pitching badly – I had only given up two hits before Tony Oliva tripled to lead off the fourth and Bob Allison hit a sacrifice fly to Mickey Mantle in center field, and we were losing 1-0.  Elston Howard doubled to left to lead off the eighth and Hector Lopez pinch hit for me.  Ralph Houk put Horace Clarke in to run for Ellie, and Hoss was able to get to second after Hector hit a deep shot to center.  Hoss scored on Roy White’s single, tying the game.  White advanced to second on Bobby Richardson’s hit, and scored on Joe Pepitone’s double to left. The Yankees won 2-1, my third career victory – in part thanks to Headley.

On August 4, 1966, we were playing the Angeles at Anaheim Stadium.  I was pitching and Headley was playing Right Field.  I remember the game because it was my worst performance of the season.  I have up two runs and two hits in the bottom of the first.  In the second, gave up a leadoff single to Buck Rodgers, who moved to second on Bobby Knoop’s single. They both advanced a base on Ed Kirkpatrick’s groundout.  Then the pitcher, Marcelino Lopez, hit an infield single, with Rodgers scoring and Knoop moving to third.  Jose Cardenal came to the plate with runners on first and third and one out and hit a triple to Headley in right field.  Headley misplayed the ball, removing the option of getting Jose at third.  Instead, two more runs scored.  Jay hit an RBI single and I was gone after 1 1/3 innings, having given up six runs.  So after Dooley Womack finishes the inning, Headley comes up to me in the dugout and apologizes for the play.  Imagine that, this classic Yankee apologizing to a rookie who just pitched horribly.  “Sorry, Peta,” he said.  “I owe you one.”  What a great guy!