Tagged: Ken Berry

The Cleveland Indians, 1975

Cleveland IndiansAt Municipal Stadium before a game in 1975, our team photo: (Left to Right, front row): clubhouse manager Cy Buynak, trainer Jimmy Warfield, coach Harvey Haddix, coach Tom McCraw, president Ted Bonda, manager Frank Robinson, general manager Phil Seghi, traveling secretary Mike Seghi, coach Jeff Torborg, coach Dave Garcia, batboy; (second row) Fred Beene, John Lowenstein, Oscar Gamble, Ken Berry, Jackie Brown, Alan Ashby, Dave LaRoche, John Ellis, Tommy Smith, Fritz Peterson, Rick Manning, Frank Duffy, Duane Kuiper; (third row) Buddy Bell, George Hendrick, Ed Crosby, Dennis Eckersley, Jim Bibby, Boog Powell, Eric Raich, Charlie Spikes, Tom Buskey, Rico Carty, Roric Harrison.

Happy Birthday, Bill Melton

Bill MeltonHappy Birthday to Bill Melton, who was a power-hitting third baseman for the Chicago White Sox while I was pitching for the New York Yankees.  Some called him Beltin’ Bill because he hit 160 Home Runs in a short ten-year career that prematurely ended due to injury.  He hit 33 Home Runs with 95 RBI’s in 1970, his second full major league season, and 33 Home Runs (best in the American League).  Between 1968 and 1976, we played in 22 games together.  He went 18-for-30, a career average of .300 – and after Paul Blair, no one hit more Home Runs off me that Bill Melton.

One game that comes to mind against Bill and the White Sox was on August 26, 1969, a weeknight game at Yankee Stadium.  I was facing a very tough pitcher in Tommy John.  We got off to a good start when Tommy gave up a second inning two-run Home Run to our catcher, Frank Fernandez.  Tommy and I were pitching nicely; each of us got into jams a few times, but we both pitched our way out of them.  By the time Chisox manager Al Lopez pulled him for a pinch runner in the top of the ninth, Tommy had not let more Yankees score.  I was also pitching a shutout as I entered the ninth.  Ron Hansen (my future teammate), hitting for Tommy, led off with a single to left.  Gene Michael’s fielding error let Walt Williams (also my future teammate) reach first and Tommy McCraw (running for Ron) move to second.  Luis Aparicio bunted to Bobby Cox at third, moving Tommy to third and No Neck to second.  I got a second out when Don Pavletich popped up to Ron Woods in center.  Then Beltin’ Bill comes up and hits a double past Roy White in left, scoring Tommy and No Neck and tying the game up 2-2.  Ralph Houk had enough of me and brought in Lindy McDaniel to get the third out.

Wilbur Wood came in to pitch in the bottom of the ninth and retired the Yankees 1-2-3.  Lindy pitched the top of the tenth in what was clearly a metaphor for the Horace Clarke Era.  Stick made another error at shortstop, putting Ken Berry on first.  Then Bobby Cox committed a throwing error, putting Ken on third and Bobby Knopp on first.  Frank Fernandez let a ball get by him and Bobby advanced to second.   Then Pete Ward (yet another future teammate) hit a sacrifice fly to left, scoring Berry and giving the White Sox a 3-2 lead.

The Yankees rallied in the bottom of the tenth, but they couldn’t get the job done.  Gary Bell, now pitching for the White Sox, gave up a leadoff walk to Roy White.  Then he walked Fernandez, advancing Heeba to second; Lopez switched pitchers (now Danny Lazar); The Major put Jerry Kenney in to run for Julio Big Head.  Bobby Murcer bunted – well, as usual – to the Birthday Boy at third, with Heeba and Lobo each advancing a base.  Lazar intentionally walks Ron Woods.   Now Danny Murphy comes in to pitch.  Batting for Cox, Jimmie Hall hit popped up to Aparicio at short.  With two outs, bases loaded, and down 3-2, The Major puts Jake Gibbs in to hit for Len Boehmer.  Giblets struck out looking, ending the game with a painful loss for the entire team.

One last story – quickly, I promise: the last time I ever faced Bill Melton was on May 9, 1976 at Anaheim Stadium.  We were both at the ends of our careers – Bill with the Angels, me with the Indians (not long before my trade to the Rangers).  Birthday Boy came up in the bottom of the seventh with two outs and Cleveland ahead 2-0 and hits a single to center.

The game I remember most: July 4, 1966

I pitched in 355 major league baseball games over an 11-year career – 2,218 1/3 innings, I gave up 2,217 hits, 947 runs, 173 Home Runs, and I struck out 1,015 batters.  I’m blessed by a multitude of memories.  But when people ask me what game I remember most, there is nothing to think about.  It was July 4, 1966, the second game of an Independence Day doubleheader at Yankee Stadium.  I was a 24-year-old rookie and a starting pitcher for the greatest sports team in the history of the planet.  And as I took the mound for the start of the 8th inning, I was throwing a perfect game.  I had retired the first 21 batters.  I struck out Tommie Agee twice.  I don’t mean to sound arrogant, put I had great stuff.  In the first seven innings, home plate umpire Jim Odom had only called 13 balls.

We were playing the White Sox, the team I rooted for as a kid growing up in Chicago.  My guys were making some great plays in the field.  This was the day Ralph Houk ended his experiment of playing Tommy Tresh at third and Clete Boyer at sort.  Thank god; Tommy and Clete were amazing.  And the Yankee offense came through.  I led off the third inning with a single to left off Juan Pizarro, and scored on Bobby Richardson’s double.  Lou Clinton drove in Bobby and Dick Schofield to put us up 3-0.  We scored two more runs in the fifth when Jake Gibbs drove in Lou and Clete Boyer.

There were some hairy moments, like in the fourth inning when Don Buford almost beat out a bunt.  (Thank you, Clete Boyer!) and in the sixth when a relatively new Yankee, Dick Schofield, made an incredible back-handed stop at short that prevented Ken Berry from getting what should have been a bit.

So, to paraphrase Dickens, it was the best of times and it was the worst of times.  In the dugout, no one said anything, except for pitching coach Jim Turner (a Yankee legend, but not my favorite coach), who just told me to “relax.”  Gene Freese led off the 8th with a shot to left field – deep left field – that was caught magnificently by Tommy.  I had now retired 22 batters – five outs away from pitching the first perfect game since Don Larsen in the 1956 World Series.   But no immortality for me; this is where the universe turned.  Jerry Adair came to the plate – the same Jerry Adair who would have a .167 batting average against me.  Jerry hits – maybe it’ better if I say taps – the ball about twenty feet up the third base side of the mound.  I got it, and threw it high to Ray Baker at first base.  E-1, a throwing error – my throwing error – and for the first time a White Sox player had reached first base.  So no perfect game, but still a no-hitter.  Everything’s gonna be fine.

The great Ralph Houk reacts to John Romano breaking up my no-hitter in the 8th inning.

The great Ralph Houk reacts to John Romano breaking up my no-hitter in the 8th inning.

The next batter was John Romano, the White Sox catcher.  Before you ask, John would wind up with a .250 average against me – for those who don’t particularly enjoy math, that means he gets a hit one out of every four times.  And this, my friends, would be one of them.  John hit a single right up the middle.  Nothing we could do about it.  The no-hitter was off the table; now the Chisox have runners on first and second, and we still needed to win this game.  Berry gets up and hits a double to left, and Adair scored.  Al Weis, who pinch-ran for Romano, moved to third.  Then Lee Elia hits a sacrifice fly to center; Weis scored (Yankees 5, White Sox 2).  Next up was Bill Skowron, a true Yankee legend, who was pinch hitting. Moose hit a grounder to first baseman Ray Barker, who flipped it to me to get the third out in the most memorable inning of my life.  I led off the ninth with a groundout — kudos to The Major, who didn’t pinch hit for me on this incredible day.  The Yankees won – yeah, I know, that’s what matters – and I have one heck of a story to tell.   Thank you for listening to it, and Happy Fourth of July.