Tagged: Kansas City Royals

Happy Birthday, Hal McRae

Hal McRaeHappy Birthday to Hal McRae, who was an amazing hitter for the Kansas City Royals during the 1970’s and 1980’s.  He had 2,091 career hits and a lifetime .290 batting average – the kind of solid player that often gets overlooked by visiting team fans.  But take it from me, as a pitcher, I was always a little nervous when Hal came up to bat.  I remember one game on August 27, 1974, when I was with the Cleveland Indians, Hal was especially tough on me.  We were playing in Kansas City, and in the bottom of the second he hit an RBI double down the left field line.  The last time I pitched to Hal was about two weeks before the Indians traded me to Texas.  In the bottom of the sixth, I gave up a leadoff single to George Brett.  Big John Mayberry hit a shot to right field that Charlie Spikes was able to catch.  One away.  Then Hal came up to bat.  I struck him out, and then Alan Ashby was able to catch George stealing second.  Inning over.  It was nice to see Hal become a MLB manager, and to see Hal’s son, Brian, play major league baseball.

My last game as a Yankee player

My last day as a Yankee player – in my heart, I’ll always be a Yankee – was on April 25, 1974. The Royals were in town and we were playing a Thursday afternoon game at Shea Stadium. Steve Kline was pitching against Paul Splittorff, who had been a couple of years behind by at Arlington High School in the Chicago suburbs. It was the 18th game of the season and we were two games above .500, ½ game behind the 1st place Orioles (not that April stats matter). Steve gave up five runs off six hits and Bill Virdon replaced him with one out in the sixth with Freddy Beene. I came in for Freddy in the seventh to pitch the final three innings of the game. I gave up hits to Cookie Rojas and Amos Otis, but struck out Hal McRae looking to end the inning without too much damage. I had a 1-2-3 eighth inning, and took the mound in the ninth for what would be my last inning as a Yankee pitcher. Bobby Floyd led off with a walk, and Patek bunted to me, putting men on first and second. Rojas bunted, but I through it to Graig Nettles to force Floyd at third. Patek and Rojas advanced a base on my wild pitch. Virdon had me walk Otis and pitch to Big John Mayberry, who hit a grounder to first. Bill Sudakis tossed it to Jim Mason to force Otis at second, but Patek scored and Rojas moved to third. What I didn’t know at the time was that after nine seasons as a Yankee, I was about to face my last batter in pinstripes #19. It was Hal McRae. On a 1-2 count, he hit a fly to Walt Williams in right to end the inning. Kansas won 6-1. The next day, the Yankees announced that they had traded Steve, Freddy and me (coincidentally – and I mean it – all three pitchers from the most recent loss) – along with Tom Buskey – to the Cleveland Indians for Chris Chambliss, Dick Tidrow and Cecil Upshaw. And as a classic New York film character once said, this is the business we have chosen.

It’s not like I didn’t see it coming. The Yankees were a class organization and Gabe Paul told me he was trying to trade me. I wanted to pitch, and I was maybe the fifth man in what was then a four-man rotation – Mel Stottlemyre, Doc Medich, Pat Dobson and Steve Kline. My last start was April 11, the second game of a Sunday double header — ironically against Cleveland — and it didn’t go well. I gave up three runs on nine hits and got pulled in the fourth inning. Sudden Sam McDowell, who was battling me for the fifth starter spot, came in relief. Mr. Paul and the Indians GM, Phil Seghi, had been working on a trade for weeks. While I was pitching my last three innings, Mr. Paul worked out the deal. He really wanted Chambliss, and who can blame him.

If you want more information on the days leading up to the trade, legendary New York sportswriter Murray Chass wrote a column about it a few days earlier. I posted it to my website: https://fritzpetersondotorg.files.wordpress.com/2015/06/chassapril1974.pdf

And in case you were wondering about Freddy Beene​, who is my Facebook friend: the last batter he faced in a Yankee uniform was Bobby Floyd, and he struck him out.