Tagged: John Kennedy

Happy Birthday, Cap Peterson

Cap PetersonFor the first four years of my career, I was one of two Peterson’s to play major league baseball. I want to remember the life of Cap Peterson, no relation, who played for the Giants, Senators and Indians during his eight year career. When I first came up with the Yankees, Cap was with the Giants. I met him in 1967, after San Francisco traded him for Mike McCormick. Cousin Cap was really tough on me in his first few plate appearances. It was April 12, 1967 at D.C. Stadium and I was matched up with Joe Coleman. I got jammed up in the first inning, when Frank Howard hit a two-out RBI triple, followed by me walking Cap. Fortunately I got Ken Harrelson to fly out. The second inning – my last one – was worse. After successive errors by Shortstop John Kennedy and First Baseman Ray Barker, I walked the pitcher to load the bases. Then I walked Ed Brinkman. Fred Valentine drove in two runs with a single to left. After intentionally walking Hondo, Cap drove in two more runs with a double to center. Jim Bouton came in relief, walked Harrelson, and Ken McMullen hit a grand slam Home Run. We lost 10-4. Cap hit a double in his next at bat against me a few weeks later, but he ended up with a .211 career average against me. Tragically, Cap died in 1980 of kidney disease at age 37. He would have been 73 today.

Monument Monday: Steve Hamilton and the Folly Floater

Steve HamiltonSteve Hamilton is still remembered for his Folly Floater pitch, and his Yankee teammates will never forget the time he swallowed some of his chewing tobacco and threw up on the mount.  Abby came to the Yankees in a 1963 trade with the Washington Senators, so he was there when I made the team in 1966.  We met at spring training.  We were Yankee pitchers together until the last month of the 1970 season, when the let him go and the White Sox claimed him off the waiver list.  We had fun together, were friends off the field, and stayed in touch until he passed away of colon cancer at the young age of 63.    One of the coolest facts about Abby is that he also played in the NBA for two or three years; I think only two guys have ever played in both a World Series and in the NBA finals.  The dude was 6’6.  I remember that Carl Yastrzemski couldn’t hit Abby; he had a career .143 batting average against him.  If I had to pick one guy to get out, it would have been the best player for our biggest rival.

There was one game in 1970 against the Red Sox that I remember well because I was the starting pitcher.  It was June 21 at Fenway Park.  We were in 2nd place in the AL East, 3 game behind the Orioles, and I was having the best season of my career – soon afterwards, I would be named for the first (and only) time to the American League All-Star team.   The game started off well enough, a 1-2-3 first inning.  But in the bottom of the second, I wasn’t throwing well.  Tony Conigliaro led off with a single, and moved to third on a one-out single by George Scott.  I struck Billy Conigliaro out, but then Jerry Moses hit an RBI single. Then George scored on a single by the Red Sox pitcher, Gary Peters.  Jerry scored off a single by Mike Andrews.  We were down 3-1.  Yaz led off the third with a single and Ralph Houk had enough.  I was out, Ron Klimkowski was in.  The lead bounced back and forth a few times.  The Major pulled Ron in the sixth for Abby, who walked Yaz; then Jack Aker came in to pitch.  Long story short, Yankees won 14-10 in an 11-inning game.  Bobby Murcer led us to victory, robbing Yaz of a Home Run in the eighth with an incredible catch, and a key double in the top of the eleventh.

(OK, I have to make a full disclosure here: You may be wondering why I wrote about a game where Abby pitched to one batter and walked him in a post about Abby.  I started writing about the 6/21/70 Red Sox game because I thought it was the one Abby won for us.  But I had it wrong.  But I figured any story that ends with Bobby Murcer robbing Carl Yastrzemski of a Home Run, followed by an extra-inning RBI double ought not become the victim of the delete key.  Fair enough?)

Here are the ones I should have led with: two 1970 games against the Brewers at Yankee Stadium.  On May 2, I started the game and had a 4-0 lead going into the sixth inning.  John Kennedy, a former Yankee, led off with a single to center.  I struck out Rich Rollins, walked Tommy Harper, and John scored on Ted Kubiak’s single.  I struck out Ted Savage; then Kubiak stole second and Tommy stole third.  I walked Danny Walton, loading the bases.  Mike Hershberger hit a two-run single to center, and The Major brought in Lindy McDaniel to pitch.  I left the game with a 4-3 lead.   Milwaukee scored two runs off Lindy and Jack Aker in the eighth, putting them ahead 5-4.   Jerry McNertney hit a leadoff homer against Joe Verbanic in the ninth (6-4) and then loaded the bases with two walks and a single.  The Major brought in Abby, who struck out the next two batters to end the inning.  This game ends the way I like them to end: Bobby Murcer hit a two-run homer in the bottom of the ninth to tie the game, and with runners on first and second, Thurman Munson hit a walk-off single to win the game.  Abby got the win.

The next day, May 3, the first game of a Sunday afternoon doubleheader, starter Bill Burbach and reliever Ron Klimkowski gave up a combined 5 runs in the first three innings.  The lead bounced back and forth for a while and in the sixth, with the Brewers ahead 6-5, Abby came in to pitch.  He gave up another run after Kennedy doubled, Bob Meyer bunted him to third, and Tommy Harper got an RBI sacrifice fly.  The Yankee offense came through for Abby in the bottom of the sixth   Bobby Murcer led off with a single, but got forced at second by Roy White’s ground out.  Heeba scored on Danny Cater’s single to left.  Then Thurman Munson came in as a pinch hitter for Jake Gibbs and tripled, scoring Danny.  That was followed by Gene Michael’s double, scoring Tugboat.  Abby ended the inning with a pop up to the shortstop, nut the Yankees now had an 8-7 lead.

I think this part is important: the fact that The Major let Abby hit with a runner on second and a one-run lead is a testament to Abby’s pitching.  He was doing well, and they weren’t going to risk taking him out.  Abby did not disappoint: he got out of the seventh unbruised, with just one base runner on a walk; he had a 1-2-3 eighth.  And he won the game in the ninth with another 1-2-3 inning.  It was great pitching – for the second time in two days.

Watch Abby’s Folly Floater: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WFvp7kMraAw

How the Seattle Pilots helped shape the George Steinbrenner Era

Writing about Don Mincher got me thinking about the Seattle Pilots, the expansion team that lasted just one year at Sick’s Stadium before going bankrupt moving and becoming the Milwaukee Brewers. A bunch of my teammates and friends wound up on the Pilots: Mike Hegan, Steve Whitaker, Mike Ferraro, John Kennedy, Steve Barber, Dooley Womack and Jim Bouton, whose time with the Pilots became the focus of his controversial best seller (and one of my favorite books), Ball Four. Two future teammates, Jack Aker and Fred Stanley came to the Yankees from the Pilots.

Steve Whitaker innocently played a role in the Yankees comeback: just two weeks before opening day, the Pilots made a trade with the Royals that sent a promising outfielder named Lou Piniella to Kansas City for Steve. Lou was the 1969 AL Rookie of the Year and Steve had to wear the weird Pilots cap and settle for just being a good guy. With closer Lindy McDaniel expendable because the Yankees got Sparky Lyle for Danny Cater, the Whitaker trade sort of set up the Piniella for McDaniel deal that made Lou my Yankee teammate for the start of the 1974 season. And my trade to Cleveland for Chris Chambliss and Dick Tidrow helped create the winning George Steinbrenner Era. As I keep saying, the Yankees gave up a lot of talent for Chris and Dick, but they clearly got the best of that deal.

Baseball Cards of my Yankee teammates as members of the 1969 Seattle Pilots

Happy Birthday, Don Mincher

Happy Birthday to Don Mincher, who was a strong hitter and would be more widely known had he played for contending teams during a long and highly regarded baseball career. One bit of trivia to start: Don was the starting first baseman in the first game of the Seattle Pilots in 1969, along onetime Yankees Steve Whitaker and Mike Hegan. (I never got any starts against the Pilots that historic season.) I faced Don several times during my career and generally did fine against him; I looked up his average and he hit about 50 points less against me than he did against others. The game I remember was against the California Angels on April 28, 1967, before a scant crowd at Yankee Stadium. In the second, my friend Rick Reichardt hit a single to a shortstop named John Kennedy. Jose Cardenal walked, moving Rick to second. Then Don comes up and hits a three-run homer. I don’t think I even turned around; I knew it was gone when I heard the sound of the ball hitting the bat. I gave up 173 Home Runs during my career, and pitchers don’t forget any of them. I gave up another run that inning, putting the Angels ahead 4-1. I made it through the next three innings fine, and in the fifth Horace Clarke pinch hit for me. The Yankees won the game 5-4, with Steve Whitaker carrying the team with an RBI single and a Home Run. Tom Tresh homered, and the Yankees went ahead in the eighth when Charley Smith scored on Elston Howard’s sacrifice fly. Dooley Womack got the win, and I got to enjoy serving up one of Don Mincher’s 200th career Home Runs.