Tagged: Frank Tepedino

Monument Monday: Larry Gowell

LARRY GOWELLLarry Gowell was only with the Yankees for a brief time during the 1972 season, but that was enough for him to achieve a sort of immortality in the baseball history books.  It was October 4, 1972 and we were at Yankee Stadium playing the Brewers.  Larry was the leadoff hitter in the bottom of the third and smacked a double off Jim Lonborg that went past John Briggs in left.  Larry was left stranded on second as the next three Yankees failed to drive him home.  But the hit was historic because it was the last game of the season, and as it turned out, he was the last American League pitcher to get a hit before the Designated Hitter rule went into effect the following April.  So Larry’s bat now has a place at Cooperstown.

Thanks to the leadership of CBS (sarcasm intended here), the Yankees got the #1 draft pick in 1967, the third year Amateur Draft.  Larry was their first pick in the fourth round – Ron Blomberg was the #1 pick in the first round.  The first time I saw Larry pitch was the first exhibition game of the 1970 season.  He had a natural slider and his fast ball was as fast as any other Yankee in spring training.  We were Pompano Beach playing the Washington Senators and Larry came in to pitch in the ninth inning.  We were ahead, 6-5.  I think he was a little nervous.  His first batter was Del Unser and he hit him with the pitch.  His second batter was a teenager named Jeff Burroughs, who hit a massive Home Run.

Larry spent the 1972 season with the West Haven Yankees, the Eastern League AA club that was being managed by the Bobby Cox, now a Hall of Fame manager.  He was on fire and the Yankee pitchers were following him closely.  In 26 games, he was 14-6 with a 2.54 ERA and 171 strikeouts in 181 innings.

Larry was a September call-up at a time when the Yankees were in a four-way race for First Place in the AL East.  He made his major league debut in the bottom of the sixth inning on September 21, at County Stadium.  With the Brewers ahead 4-0, Ralph Houk had removed Freddy Beene the previous inning for a pinch hitter, Rusty Torres.  Larry retired the first three major league batters he faced: John Briggs, Ollie Brown and Mike Ferraro.  Then in the seventh, he did the same thing against Rick Auerbach, Jerry Bell (the pitcher), and Ron Theobald.  With two outs, The Major took him out in the eighth so Felipe Alou could hit.  Felipe singled, the beginning of a Yankee rally.  He moved to second on Horace Clarke’s hit, and scored on Roy White’s hit.  The Bobby Murcer hit an RBI single, reducing Milwaukee’s lead to one run.  Unfortunately, Bloomie flied out to end the inning, leaving Roy and Bobby on base.  The Brewers wound up beating us, 6-4, and we wasted a rare ninth inning homer by Bernie Allen.

October 4 was the last game of the season and we had lost four in a row, dropping us to 4th place, 6 ½ games behind the Detroit Tigers.  Since we were out of contention, The Major decided to give Larry the start.   He pitched really, really well.  He gave up his first major league hit in the second to Joe Lahoud, and Briggs hit a sacrifice fly to center, scoring Dave May, who had doubled.  With the Yankees trailing 1-0 in the bottom of the sixth inning, no outs and Jerry Kenney on first, The Major pulled Larry for a pinch hitter, Frank Tepedino.  Larry had given up three hits, and had struck out six.  It was an amazing demonstration of pitching for a rookie.    We lost 1-0, as the Yankee bats were not coming through.

Larry was in contention for a major league roster spot in 1973.  He was cut at the end of spring training, losing out to Casey Cox and Doc Medich.  He didn’t make the team again in 1974; the new manager, Bill Virdon, seemed to judge him based on one bad tenth inning in an exhibition game against the Texas Rangers.  A lot of the hype that spring was about Mike Pazik, a cocky southpaw from Holy Cross who wound up getting traded to the Twins for Dick Woodson.  But Larry Gowell’s time as a MLB pitcher was indeed memorable and historic.  I am glad to have known him.

Monument Monday is a weekly tribute to the Pitchers  I knew during my baseball career.  Click here to read my previous entries.

Monument Monday: Ron Klimkowski

RON KLIMKOWSKIRon Klimkowski was one of my favorite Yankees.  He was warm and friendly all the time.  We called him Bela, because we thought he looked like the Count Dracula actor, Bela Lugosi.  In my book, I wrote a lot about him on a personal level.  But he had some talent as a pitcher also, and was proud of his Yankee alumni status until he died of heart failure at the young age of 65 in 2009.  Bela was part of two important trades involving Yankee veterans: originally signed by the Red Sox, he was the Player-To-Be-Named-Later in the trade that sent Elston Howard to Boston for the 1967 pennant race and World Series.  Four years later, the Yankees sent him to Oakland, along with Rob Gardner, for Felipe Alou.  Bela was from New York and New Jersey and he loved being a Yankee, so he signed with the Yankees after the A’s released him thirteen months later.

I remember Bela’s major league debut.  It was September 15, 1969.  He was a September call-up from Syracuse.  The Yankees were home against the Detroit Tigers, and Stan Bahnsen was pitching against Denny McClain, who was again dominating the American League.  It was still a little weird seeing Tommy Tresh in a Tiger uniform, even though his trade for Ron Woods had happened a couple of months before.  Ralph Houk pinch hit for Stan in the bottom of the sixth, and Bela arrived on the Yankee Stadium pitcher’s mound for the first time in the top of the seventh.  We were down 2-0.  The first MLB batter he faced was Cesar Gutierrez, who had come in to replace Tommy at Shortstop in the first inning.  Cesar grounded out to Jerry Kenney at shortstop, providing Bela with his first major league out.  He quickly got five more: Jim Northrup and Al Kaline, then Norm Cash, Willie Horton and Tommy Matchick in the eighth.  He gave up a hit, his first, to Bill Freehan in the ninth, but then retired Dick Wert, Denny and Cesar, consecutively.  So Bela was off to a great start: three scoreless innings, facing ten batters, and giving up one hit.  The problem for Bela, not his fault, was that Denny gave up just two hits the entire game, and scored his 23rd win of the season.

On September 24, The Major decided to start Bela, who pitched magnificently against the Red Sox at Fenway Park.  Maybe Bela just wanted to show Tom Yawkey what he gave up.  He pitched nine full innings, giving up no runs and just three hits.  The problem for Bela, again not his fault, is that the Yankees couldn’t get anything going offensively.  In the top of the tenth, with runners on first and second and one out, The Major sent Frank Tepedino up to  hit for Bela.  No doubt the right move.  Unfortunately, Teppie flied out.  Then Horace Clarke popped up to second to end the inning.  Jack Aker and Lindy McDaniel threw scoreless tenth and eleventh innings, respectively.  And no runs were scored off of Stan Bahnsen in the twelfth and thirteenth.  Of course the Yankees couldn’t score off the Bosox reliever, Sonny Siebert, who gave up just one hit in 4 2/3 innings.

George Scott hit a leadoff infield single off Stan in the bottom of the fourteenth; Scott got to second of a well-executed bunt by Tom Satriano.  Stan walked Dalton Jones, who came in to pinch hit for Sonny..  Then Mike Andrews doubled to left, scoring George.  As you can imagine, it’s extraordinarily painful to lose a 1-0 game to Boston in the fourteenth inning.  What was worse was that this was the best game of Ron Klimkowski’s baseball career.

Monument Monday is a weekly tribute to the Pitchers  I knew during my baseball career.  Click here to read my previous entries.

Happy Birthday, Danny Walton

Danny WaltonHappy Birthday to Danny Walton, who was my teammate on the New York Yankees from 1971 to 1972.  About two months into the 1971 season, the Yankees traded Frank Tepedino and Bobby Mitchell, once considered among the Yankees most promising prospects, to the Milwaukee Brewers.  The Yankees viewed Danny as a potential power-hitting outfielder – he had 17 Home Runs the previous season — although they knew he struck out a lot. They wanted him as a right-handed pinch hitter. He hit just one Home Run for the Yankees (a solo shot off Dave McNally in a game the Orioles won 10-4.  He also had knee problems that affected his career and played only five games for us before he was optioned to Syracuse to make room on the roster for a young up-and-comer named Ron Blomberg.   He spent 1972 in AAA and the Yankees traded him to Baltimore for Rick Dempsey before he ever returned to pinstripes.

I say this respectfully, but as a pitcher I never really feared Danny Walton.  The first time I saw him was on May 2, 1970 at Yankee Stadium and I struck him out twice in his first two at-bats.  Then I walked him.  A week later, we made our first trip to County Stadium in Milwaukee, where the Seattle Pilots had relocated after one year.  The next time I pitched to Danny, I stuck him out three times in three at-bats.  He didn’t get a hit off me until July.  In all, I struck Danny out eleven times in twenty at-bats, and he had a lifetime .200 batting average against me, with no extra base hits and no RBI’s.  But Danny got the best of me at the end: two of his four career hits off me came in the final two at-bats against me, when he was with the Minnesota Twins.

Danny missed a lot of time because of his bad knees, but he still put together a career that lasted (on and off) from 1968 to 1980, and I admire that.

Happy Birthday, Jerry Kenney

Happy Birthday to my Yankee teammate, Jerry Kenney.  I called Jerry “Lobo,” a nickname given to him by Horace Clarke; he was the Yankees regular third baseman from 1969 to 1972.  We first met way back in 1964 as minor league teammates on the Shelby (North Carolina) Yankees in the Western Carolinas League (Class A).  Lobo made his major league debut on September 5, 1967 at Yankee Stadium.   Unfortunately, I remember the game well.  I started against the White Sox, and gave up three runs in the first inning.  I had nothing, absolutely nothing.  Ralph Houk pulled me in the second after giving up two hits and (accidentally, really) hitting Tommy McCraw with a pitch.  With the Yankees losing 5-3, Lobo led off the bottom of the ninth as a pinch hitter for Ruben Amaro and Bob Locker struck him out.  But that had to be an exciting night for Jerry, who will always be able to say that he played in his first major league game with Mickey Mantle.  #7 came in to pinch hit for Jim Bouton (who replaced me) in the bottom of the second and hit a double, driving in the Yankees third run.

My best memory of Lobo was on September 30, 1970 at Fenway Park.  It was the last game of the season and I was going for my 20th win.  In my book, I described asking Houk to play someone else at third; I’m sure glad The Major didn’t take player requests.  In the fourth, he hit a two-run single to center, driving in Frank Tepedino and Jim Lyttle.  The Yankees won 4-3, and I won 20 games for the only time in my career.

Lobo got dealt to the Indians in 1972, in what would be a monumental deal for the Yankees comeback.  The Yankees sent him, along with Johnny Ellis, Charlie Spikes and Rusty Torres, to Cleveland for Craig Nettles and Jerry Moses.

My last At-Bat

Like most pitchers, I wasn’t much of a hitter. My career average was .159 – 82 hits, including 15 doubles, a triple, and two “historic” home runs (off Clyde Wright and Mike Cuellar).  I actually hit well my rookie season, 1966: .224, which was four points higher than a right fielder named Lou Clinton, a very nice man who was nearing the end of his career.  Of course my hitting career came to an end in 1973 when the AL adopted the Designated Hitter rule.  I was fine with that; it made it a little tougher when #9 in the order was no longer a pitcher, but fans liked the idea of some veteran hitters staying on a bit longer and so did I.   My last major league at-bat came on October 1, 1972, the first game of a Sunday double header against the Cleveland Indians at Yankee Stadium – my last start of the season because there was no post-season in the “Horace Clarke Era.”  It was one of the most memorable games of my career – an 11-inning complete game!  How many times has that happened?

Gaylord Perry was pitching for the Indians, and he was enjoying the best seasons of his career: 24-16, with a 1.92 ERA, 234 strikeouts, and winning the Cy Young Award.   He also pitched a complete game – his 29th of the season.  So I repeat my question: when was the last time two pitchers threw an 11-inning complete game in the same game?

This was not an inconsequential game.  The Yankees began the day tied for 3rd in the AL East with the Orioles, while the Red Sox and Tigers were in a down-to-the-wire battle for first.  We were five games out of first place, with five games remaining.  We were eliminated from winning the division since Boston and Detroit had three games left against each other.  But there was a scenario that could have had us in 2nd – not 4th, where we wound up – and that was worth trying for.

The Yankees scored in the fourth when Roy White scored on Bernie Allen’s ground rule double, and the Indians tied it in the fifth when Ray Fosse hit a leadoff Home Run against me.  The game remained 1-1 until the top of the eleventh.  Buddy Bell led off with a double to left, and moved to third on Jack Brohamer’s grounder to Ron Bloomberg at first.  Chris Chambliss hit a sacrifice fly to Bobby Murcer in center; Bell scored, and we were down 2-1.   I was supposed to lead off the bottom of the eleventh, but naturally Ralph Houk pinch hit for me.  Frank Tepedino struck out looking.  Then Horace Clarke filed out and Thurman Munson grounded out.  We lost 2-1.

I don’t presume to know anything about baseball compared to Houk, who was one of the smartest baseball strategists I ever knew.  But 43 years later, maybe it’s ok to wonder what he was thinking when he sent Tepedino, who was 0-8 as a September call up, to leadoff in the bottom of the eleventh, one run down. There were only two left-handed hitter on the bench: Tepedino and Johnny Callison, who was a .216 lifetime hitter against Perry but was hitting .280 vs. righties that season.  Would it have been better to take his chances with Johnny Ellis, a right-handed hitter with a .294 average and a .270 average against right-handed pitchers that season?  Or an experienced hitter, like Ron Swoboda?  We will never know.

Anyway, there was a point to this post, and finally I’m getting to it.  With the DH starting in 1973 – call it the Ron Bloomberg Lifetime of Fame Rule – this was the last time I would ever bat in a major league game.  I popped up to shortstop Frank Duffy in the fourth, and struck out in the fifth — I was one of Perry’s eleven strikeouts that game.  My final career At-Bat came in the eighth, with a ground out to second.  As I said earlier, Teppie pinch hit for me in the eleventh and struck out.  I think I could have done at least as well.