Tagged: Frank Howard

Happy Birthday, Cap Peterson

Cap PetersonFor the first four years of my career, I was one of two Peterson’s to play major league baseball. I want to remember the life of Cap Peterson, no relation, who played for the Giants, Senators and Indians during his eight year career. When I first came up with the Yankees, Cap was with the Giants. I met him in 1967, after San Francisco traded him for Mike McCormick. Cousin Cap was really tough on me in his first few plate appearances. It was April 12, 1967 at D.C. Stadium and I was matched up with Joe Coleman. I got jammed up in the first inning, when Frank Howard hit a two-out RBI triple, followed by me walking Cap. Fortunately I got Ken Harrelson to fly out. The second inning – my last one – was worse. After successive errors by Shortstop John Kennedy and First Baseman Ray Barker, I walked the pitcher to load the bases. Then I walked Ed Brinkman. Fred Valentine drove in two runs with a single to left. After intentionally walking Hondo, Cap drove in two more runs with a double to center. Jim Bouton came in relief, walked Harrelson, and Ken McMullen hit a grand slam Home Run. We lost 10-4. Cap hit a double in his next at bat against me a few weeks later, but he ended up with a .211 career average against me. Tragically, Cap died in 1980 of kidney disease at age 37. He would have been 73 today.

Happy Birthday, Frank Howard

frank howard Happy Birthday to Frank Howard, one of the most fearsome hitters I ever played against. In his sixteen major league seasons, he hit 382 Home Runs and scared the hell out of hundreds of pitchers like me. Hondo had a .328 career against me. The first time I faced him was on July 8, 1966, the first game of a Friday night doubleheader at Yankee Stadium. It was my rookie season. Fred Valentine started the game with a leadoff bunt to me and made it safely to first; then he moved to second on Ken Hamlin’s bunt to me. Ken Harrelson hit an RBI double to right. Hondo came up and hit a Triple to center, scoring Ken. We were down 2-0. I got the next two batters out. The Yankees won, 7-5, and I pitched a complete game. And I remember the first time I pitched against the new Texas Rangers in Arlington in 1972, Hondo homered off me too. Besides the Rangers and Senators, where he was also known as the Capital Punisher, he also played for the Dodgers and Tigers. And Hondo was also a Yankee: he coached for New York for three seasons and was a longtime Yankee minor league instructor.

Happy Birthday, Don Lock

Don LockHappy Birthday to Don Lock, an outfielder who came up through the Yankee farm system and played MLB for the Senators, Phillies and Red Sox in the 1960’s.  The Yankees traded him to the Senators in 1962 for Dale Long and he made his MLB for Washington that season.  I faced Don twice in my career, both times in my rookie season.  On July 8, 1966, we were playing the second game of a Sunday doubleheader at Yankee Stadium.  I remember the game largely because of how badly it started.  It was also the day I learned what a great baseball mind Gil Hodges, the Senators’ manager, had.   Fred Valentine led off the first inning with a bunt to me and made it safely to first.   Then Ken Hamlin bunted again to me; I got him out at first but now had a runner on second.  I’m already in a jam.  Ken Harrelson hit an RBI double, followed by Frank Howard’s RBI triple.  Don was the next batter; I got him and Ken McMullen out.

The second inning went poorly too.  Ed Brinkman singled and moved to second when I walked Jim Hannan, the pitcher; he scored on Hamlin’s double.  Hannan scored when I threw a wild pitch.  Now we are down 4-0.   Lock came up again the third inning and singled to Joe Pepitone in right.  With two outs, Don took a big lead off first and I picked him off – threw it to Ray Barker at first, who threw it to Bobby Richardson at second, and then back to Ray, who easily tagged Don to end the inning.   The Yankees came back, incrementally, starting with Mickey Mantle’s Home Run in the bottom of the third.  We won the game 8-5.  I pitched a complete game for the eighth win of my fledgling baseball career.

Happy Birthday, Hank Allen

Hank AllenHappy Birthday to Hank Allen, who played for the Senators, Brewers and White Sox from 1966 to 1973.  The Yankees opened the season at D.C. Stadium with President Lyndon Johnson throwing out the first pitch.  Mel Stottlemyre pitched opening day and the Yankees won.  I was the pitcher in the second game, and this was the first time I saw Dick Allen’s little brother.  The problem for me was that I didn’t make it to his At-Bat.  I gave up an RBI triple to Frank Howard in the first, and had a much worse second inning.  I have up five runs and Jim Bouton came in to replace me.  I had to wait until August 27, when the Yankees returned to Washington, to actually throw a pitch to Hank.  It was the bottom of the first with two outs and runners on second and third; he grounded out to Charley Smith at third to end the inning.  After getting a leadoff walk against me in the fourth, he flew out to Roy White in right in the sixth and I struck him out in the eighth.  The Yankees won 8-2.  Hank had a lifetime .269 average against me; that was higher than his brother, Dick, whose career average was .250 off my pitching.  I never faced the third Allen brother, Ron, who played only in the National League.

The four times Frank Robinson almost became a Yankee

Frank RobinsonOne Hall of Famer that eluded the New York Yankees was Frank Robinson, despite repeated attempts to get him in pinstripes. As early as 1965, the Cincinnati Reds were shopping this superstar at winter meetings. My understanding was that the Reds owner thought Robby was an “old 30” and that his body would not withstand much more of a baseball career. He was anxious to trade him while the value remained high. There was talk that the Reds had offered him to the Astros for Jimmy Wynn and a relief pitcher named Claude Raymond, but that Houston turned them down. The Yankee deal I heard about – I had just finished by third year in the minor leagues at the time – was that the Yankees would send and Joe Pepitone to the Reds for Robby and pitcher Jim O’Toole. A couple of weeks later, the Yankees traded catcher Doc Edwards to the Cleveland Indians for Lou Clinton and that seemed to end their search for a power-hitting outfielder. Maybe it was a metaphor for the Horace Clarke Era. The Reds did trade Robby, to Baltimore for Milt Pappas, Jack Baldschun and Dick Simpson. Robby won the Triple Crown in his first season with the Orioles.

After winning three AL pennants with Robby and the 1970 World Series, the Orioles put him on the trading block again. The Yankees tried to put a deal together. The problem, I was told, was that Harry Dalton wanted Mel Stottlemyre or me. Mel was the ace of the staff and I was the #2 pitcher coming off a 20-win season. Lee McPhail countered with Stan Bahnsen, and the Dalton wanted Steve Kline and Mike Kekich too. The Yankees were unwilling to decimate their pitching staff for one superstar outfielder.

Apparently the Mets were in a similar situation. The Orioles wanted Tom Seaver for Frank Robinson, straight up, and the Mets said no. The counter from Baltimore was at least two other pitchers from a list that included Jerry Koosman, Nolan Ryan, Jon Matlack, Tug McGraw, and Gary Gentry – and they Danny Frisella. The Mets said no to that too.

Most players followed the winter meetings carefully, because you never knew what would happen and how it might affect your life. But the Yankees, still owned by CBS – the George Steinbrenner Era was still a few years away – didn’t do much after they traded Bill Robinson for Barry Moore. The Washington Senators offered Frank Howard for cash the Yankees didn’t have, and the Cleveland Indians were shopping star pitcher Sudden Sam McDowell, but they apparently wanted a lot of cash too. The Boss would have had them both in pinstripes.

In 1971, after losing the AL pennant to the Oakland A’s, the Orioles traded Robby to the Los Angeles Dodgers for a group of prospects that included future Yankee Doyle Alexander. The Orioles had Don Baylor and Terry Crowley coming up and wanted to give them more playing time. And Robby was making what was then a huge salary – about $125,000 – and they wanted to unload the expense. The Yankees had shown interest in him then, but they got busy making the “blockbuster deal” that sent Bahnsen to the White Sox for Rich McKinney and missed out. After the 1972 season, the Dodgers traded Robby to the California Angeles, in what really was a blockbuster trade: the Dodgers sent Robby and Bill Singer, an excellent pitcher, to the California Angeles for pitcher Andy Messersmith, Bobby Valentine and Ken McMullen.

After the Boss bought the Yankees and brought Gabe Paul over as the GM – and after Charlie Finley refused to allow the Yankees to hire Dick Williams as their manager — there was some serious talk about hiring Robby to become baseball’s first black manager. Mr. Paul had been GM in Cincinnati when Robby was the NL Rookie of the Year and MVP, and was a huge Frank Robinson fan.

The fourth chance for the Yankees to see Frank Robinson in pinstripes came in June of 1974, when he was again on the trading block. Mr. Paul had been negotiating a deal with the Angels that I recall would have brought Robby and Rudy May to the Yankees for Roy White, Bill Sudakis and Dick Woodson. What I heard was that Robby’s contract gave him the right to veto a deal, and when the Yankees refused to pay about $35,000 in relocation expenses, Robby vetoed the trade. That was just a couple of days before I was traded to the Cleveland Indians, where Robby would soon become my teammate and my manager.

You can’t live life on a bunch of what ifs, like how my career would have been different if I has been pitching for a contending team like the Orioles. But I’ll tell you this: I met my soulmate while playing in New York, I got to play with Boog Powell anyway in Cleveland, and I wouldn’t trade my years with the Yankees for anything.

Nate Mikolas, Dick Bosman and Rick Reichardt

Nathan MikolasOutfielder Nate Mikolas of the Pulaski Yankees continues his offensive tear. He went 2-for-4 tonight with 2 runs and an RBI, and now has a .339 batting average. He’s 13-for-37 over the last ten days, and he hit for cycle last weekend. With Second Baseman Billy Fleming (.444) advancing to the Trenton Thunder AA team last week, Nate is now the team’s leading hitter, and in contention for the Appalachian League batting title. I really enjoy watching for how this young player does every day.

I’ve got Wisconsin on my mind tonight, especially because two Wisconsin guys almost stopped me from winning 20 games in 1970.  Watching Nate got me thinking about another Kenosha, Wisconsin native, Dick Bosman, who was an exceptional American League pitcher.  We were both rookies in 1966 and both pitched until 1976.  Dick was with the Washington Senators/Texas Rangers until he was traded to the Cleveland Indians in 1973. I joined him on the Tribe pitching staff the next season.  Before that we pitched against each other a few times.  I remember one game where the Senators were playing the Yankees at Yankee Stadium.  It was July 5, 1970 and I was having my career year and got to pitch in the American League All-Star game nine days later.  Dick hit a single off me in the bottom of the third inning, and scored on Frank Howard’s two-run double.  We were tied 2-2, though Dick was pitching better than me that day, and in the bottom of the eighth, Rick Reichardt – another Wisconsin native — hit an RBI single that knocked me out of the game.  We wound up losing 7-3.

Happy Birthday, Casey Cox

Casey Cox Happy Birthday to Casey Cox, my Yankee teammate in 1972 and 1973.  We were part of the Class of 1966 of American League pitchers making their major league debut; he was with the Washington Senators.  The first time we pitched against each other was on July 8, 1966 at Yankee Stadium, the second game of a twilight doubleheader.  This wasn’t exactly a battle of the titans; it was a match up of two fairly crappy teams; the ’72 Yankees were in 8th place, 19 ½ games out, and the Senators were in 9th, 21 ½ games out.

I had given up two runs in the first (including a double to Ken Harrelson and a triple to Frank Howard) and two more in the second.  We picked up three runs in the third off Mickey Mantle’s Home Run, doubles by Joe Pepitone and Ray Barker, and a single by Horace Clarke.  Casey relieved Joe Hannan in the fifth inning after Mickey singled to left and Hector Lopez (pinch running for Mickey) moved to third on Joe Pepitone’s single.  Elston Howard came to bat and hit into a double play, but Hector scored and the game was tied 4-4.  With two outs, Ray hit a deep shot to center – for a moment I thought it was going out – but Don Lock caught it and the inning was over.  Casey pitched again in the sixth, a 1-2-3 inning.  I came up with two outs and Casey struck me out – not an amazing accomplishment, but memorable to me nonetheless since it was a tie game.  I’m glad Ralph Houk didn’t pinch hit for me.

The top of the seventh was no good for me.  Paul Casanova led off with a single, and moved to second on a beautiful sacrifice bunt by Ed Brinkman.  Gil Hodges, the Senators manager, pulled Casey so that Bob Saverine could pinch hit.  Good move.  Bob singled to center and Paul scored and we’re now losing 5-4.  But my team continued to come through.  The new Washington pitcher, Dick Bosman, walked Tom Tresh; Bobby Richardson got to first base on a fielding error by Brinkman, the shortstop, with Tommy moving to second.  Hector executed a pretty good sacrifice bunt, moving Tommy to third and Bobby to second.  Hodges called for an intentional walk to Pepitone, loading the bases.  Elston Howard popped up to first; then Ray Barker hit a two-out single, with Tommy and Bobby scoring.  Now we’re ahead 6-5.  We scored one more run in the eighth when Clete Boyer hit a leadoff triple and later scored.  Dick Bosman got the loss and I was now 8-5, with another complete game but just two strikeouts.

Casey came to the Yankees on August 31, 1973 in a trade for Jim Roland, ending Jim’s four-month career in pinstripes.  He was a very good guy who had the misfortune of pitching for some bad teams – he originally signed with the Reds; timing is everything in baseball.  I’m sorry to report that the Yankees lost all five games Casey pitched in, including an excruciating loss in a game I pitched against the Red Sox; the loss was entirely on me, not Casey.  In 1974, Casey pitched in one game – he entered in the sixth, with the Red Sox ahead 12-5, and gave up three runs in three innings.  The Yankees released him soon after that, and he never pitched in the major leagues again.

A few more things about the baseball career of Casey Cox: he was managed by three baseball greats – Gil Hodges, Ted Williams and Ralph Houk; he had his career year in 1969 when he was 12-7 with a 2.78 ERA, making 13 starts in 52 games; and some excellent hitters like Carlton Fisk and Rod Carew had .143 career batting averages against him.

The other thing I think about when I remember Casey Cox is that he wore #29 and if you follow Yankee history, you know that there is not much longevity associated with guys who wear #29 on the back of their pinstripes.  Of the 55 Yankees who have worn #29, the only one to last more than a few seasons were Francisco Cervelli, Mike Stanton, Gerald Williams, Catfish Hunter, and Charlie Silvera.  Casey originally wore #39, but he wanted #29, which was his number on the Senators and the Rangers.  That switch came about because Sudden Sam McDowell, who was #39, wanted #48.  Before Sudden Sam, the number was worn by a succession of one-season guys: Wade Blasingame (1972), Jim Hardin (1971), Mike McCormick (1970), Rocky Colavito (1968), Bill Henry (1966), Bobby Tiefenauer (1965), Mike Jurewicz (1965), Tom Metcalf (1963), Hal Brown (1962), Earl Torgeson (1961), Duke Maas (1961), and Hal Stowe (1960).  After Casey was traded, #29 was assigned to Tom Buskey, who wore it from April 1973 until April 1974, when he and I were traded to Cleveland; and then Dick Woodson for the rest of that season.  Then Catfish came in 1975.  Later came short-term Yankees like Dave Collins, Paul Zuvella, Al Holland, Luis Aquayo, Dave LaPoint, Mike Humphreys, Ricky Bones, Bubba Trammel, Tony Clark, Tim Redding, Felix Escalona, Octavio Dotel, Kei Igawa, Cody Ransom, Xavier Nady, Anthony Claggett, and Rafael Soriano.  So the best I can say is Good Luck to David Carpenter.