Tagged: Davey Johnson

Happy Birthday, Gary Waslewski

GARY WASLEWSKIHappy Birthday to Gary Waslewski, who pitched with me on the New York Yankees in 1970 and 1971.  I started following Gary when he was called up by the Red Sox during the summer of 1967 after seven seasons in the minor leagues because I followed a lot of young pitchers, especially when they were pitching for your greatest rival.  And I was glued to the television set on October 11, 1967 when he was picked to start Game 6 of the World Series.  (I admit I was not rooting for him – I could never root for Boston to win anything!)  With just 42 innings of major league experience in only 12 MLB games, Gary did just fine.  Boston had a 3-2 lead when he left the mound in the top of the sixth inning after walking Roger Maris and Tim McCarver.  The Red Sox beat the Cardinals 8-4, forcing the historic Game 7.

The first time I saw Gary pitch was on May 10, 1968 at Yankee Stadium.  He pitched a complete game, striking out six, but the Yankees won 2-1.   After that season, Boston traded him to the Cardinals for Dick Schofield; six months later, St. Louis sent him to the Expos for Mudcat Grant.  The Yankees got him a little less than a year later for Dave McDonald.  Joe Verbanic got optioned to Syracuse to make room for him.  Gary’s first game in Pinstripes was on May 19, 1970 at Yankee Stadium.  He came in relief for John Cumberland.  A month later, he started a game against the Red Sox, pitched well, and the Yankees won 3-2.

The first time Gary came in to pitch in relief for me was on July 9, 1970 at Memorial Stadium in Baltimore.  I had a 5-2 lead going into the bottom of the fifth, but gave up three runs on singles by Bobby Grich, Frank Robinson, Boog Powell, and a double by Brooks Robinson.  That’s when Ralph Houk took me out.  Gary came in with two outs and a runner on second and got Davey Johnson to ground out.  We took the lead in the top of the sixth when Marcelino Lopez walked Horace Clarke with the bases loaded, and then gave up an RBI single to Jerry Kenney.  We beat the Orioles 7-5.

The Yankees released Gary at the end of Spring Training 1972 and he pitched for the Oakland A’s after that.

Rick Reichert’s Big Day

ReichhardtThe Baltimore Orioles were one of the toughest teams I ever played against. They won the World Series in 1966, my rookie year, the American League Pennant in 1969 (the first time there was a Divisional Series), the World Series in 1970, and the AL Pennant in 1971. They had an unreal team: Boog Powell at first, Davey Johnson at second, Mark Belanger at short, Brooks Robinson at third, Andy Etchebarren was the catcher, and they had Frank Robinson, Paul Blair and Don Buford in the outfield. And they had great pitching – one year it was four 20-game winners: Jim Palmer, Mike Cuellar, Dave McNally and Pat Dobson. So because they were so good in 1970, I feel compelled to recall one game between the Orioles and the Washington Senators that year – maybe just to embarrass my friend, Rick Reichert.

It was June 20, a Sunday afternoon at RFK, and it was Earl Weaver managing against Ted Williams. The game was tied 2-2, and in the top of the twelfth inning, with nothing more than a pair of walks, a pair of popups, and an error by Mike Epstein, the Orioles scored and took a 3-2 lead. In the bottom of the twelfth, Jim French drew a leadoff walk, and with one out, Rick came up to the plate to pinch hit for Lee Maye. He hit a walk-off, two run homer and delivered a rare and excruciating loss to the first-place Orioles. It was an amazing moment.

I had to look up the details, but I remember the game. The Yankees had lost to the Red Sox more than an hour earlier. We were 2 ½ games out of first place at that point and we all stuck around the clubhouse to find out how the Orioles game was going.

July 14, 1970, the day I pitched in the MLB All-Star Game

Fritz Peterson All Star 1970Happy All-Star Day!  Today marks the 45th anniversary of my one appearance in the All-Star Game.  I was honored to have been selected to the American League All-Star Team in 1970, and July 14, 1970 was one of the highlights of my career.

It’s the bottom of the ninth with the American League up 4-1 at Riverfront Stadium.  Catfish Hunter entered the game to pitch and gave up a leadoff Home Run to Dick Dietz.  Bud Harrelson then hit a single to left.  Catfish got Cito Gaston to pop up, but then Joe Morgan hit a single to right, moving Bud to second.   That’s when Earl Weaver walked to the mound and called me in to pitch.  Weaver told me that I would be facing one of the greatest Home Run hitters of all-time, the legendary Willie McCovey.  He said something like: “We’ll get him.  I ain’t worried about him.”  Easy for him to say!  Bottom of the ninth, runners on first and second, one out, and our lead is now 4-2.  And I’m facing Willie McCovey.  Holy crap.

Now I’d like to tell the story this way: McCovey hits into a double play, Aparicio to Johnson to Yastrzemski, and the American League wins.  But I can’t because things happened a bit differently.

McCovey hits a clean single to Amos Otis in center.  Harrelson scores, and Morgan moves to third. Lead is now 4-3 in the bottom of the ninth And with the great Roberto Clemente coming up to pinch hit for Bob Gibson, Weaver walked back to the mound and called my friend Mel Stottlemyre in to pitch.  Clemente hit an RBI sacrifice fly to center, tying the game 4-4.  Then Mel struck out Pete Rose to end the inning.  The rest of the story everyone knows: on Jim Hickman’s two-out, bottom of the twelfth single, Rose scored from second, barreling in to Ray Fosse at the plate.  The National League won, 5-4 – but not without Ray suffering a serious injury that plagued the rest of his career.  Another controversy Charlie Hustle has got to live with.

And so it goes into the record books: Fritz Peterson, 0 inning, 1 Hit, 1 Run, runners on the corners.  But wow, I was there and it was amazing.