Tagged: Casey Cox

Monument Monday: Larry Gowell

LARRY GOWELLLarry Gowell was only with the Yankees for a brief time during the 1972 season, but that was enough for him to achieve a sort of immortality in the baseball history books.  It was October 4, 1972 and we were at Yankee Stadium playing the Brewers.  Larry was the leadoff hitter in the bottom of the third and smacked a double off Jim Lonborg that went past John Briggs in left.  Larry was left stranded on second as the next three Yankees failed to drive him home.  But the hit was historic because it was the last game of the season, and as it turned out, he was the last American League pitcher to get a hit before the Designated Hitter rule went into effect the following April.  So Larry’s bat now has a place at Cooperstown.

Thanks to the leadership of CBS (sarcasm intended here), the Yankees got the #1 draft pick in 1967, the third year Amateur Draft.  Larry was their first pick in the fourth round – Ron Blomberg was the #1 pick in the first round.  The first time I saw Larry pitch was the first exhibition game of the 1970 season.  He had a natural slider and his fast ball was as fast as any other Yankee in spring training.  We were Pompano Beach playing the Washington Senators and Larry came in to pitch in the ninth inning.  We were ahead, 6-5.  I think he was a little nervous.  His first batter was Del Unser and he hit him with the pitch.  His second batter was a teenager named Jeff Burroughs, who hit a massive Home Run.

Larry spent the 1972 season with the West Haven Yankees, the Eastern League AA club that was being managed by the Bobby Cox, now a Hall of Fame manager.  He was on fire and the Yankee pitchers were following him closely.  In 26 games, he was 14-6 with a 2.54 ERA and 171 strikeouts in 181 innings.

Larry was a September call-up at a time when the Yankees were in a four-way race for First Place in the AL East.  He made his major league debut in the bottom of the sixth inning on September 21, at County Stadium.  With the Brewers ahead 4-0, Ralph Houk had removed Freddy Beene the previous inning for a pinch hitter, Rusty Torres.  Larry retired the first three major league batters he faced: John Briggs, Ollie Brown and Mike Ferraro.  Then in the seventh, he did the same thing against Rick Auerbach, Jerry Bell (the pitcher), and Ron Theobald.  With two outs, The Major took him out in the eighth so Felipe Alou could hit.  Felipe singled, the beginning of a Yankee rally.  He moved to second on Horace Clarke’s hit, and scored on Roy White’s hit.  The Bobby Murcer hit an RBI single, reducing Milwaukee’s lead to one run.  Unfortunately, Bloomie flied out to end the inning, leaving Roy and Bobby on base.  The Brewers wound up beating us, 6-4, and we wasted a rare ninth inning homer by Bernie Allen.

October 4 was the last game of the season and we had lost four in a row, dropping us to 4th place, 6 ½ games behind the Detroit Tigers.  Since we were out of contention, The Major decided to give Larry the start.   He pitched really, really well.  He gave up his first major league hit in the second to Joe Lahoud, and Briggs hit a sacrifice fly to center, scoring Dave May, who had doubled.  With the Yankees trailing 1-0 in the bottom of the sixth inning, no outs and Jerry Kenney on first, The Major pulled Larry for a pinch hitter, Frank Tepedino.  Larry had given up three hits, and had struck out six.  It was an amazing demonstration of pitching for a rookie.    We lost 1-0, as the Yankee bats were not coming through.

Larry was in contention for a major league roster spot in 1973.  He was cut at the end of spring training, losing out to Casey Cox and Doc Medich.  He didn’t make the team again in 1974; the new manager, Bill Virdon, seemed to judge him based on one bad tenth inning in an exhibition game against the Texas Rangers.  A lot of the hype that spring was about Mike Pazik, a cocky southpaw from Holy Cross who wound up getting traded to the Twins for Dick Woodson.  But Larry Gowell’s time as a MLB pitcher was indeed memorable and historic.  I am glad to have known him.

Monument Monday is a weekly tribute to the Pitchers  I knew during my baseball career.  Click here to read my previous entries.

Happy Birthday, Tom Tischinski

Tom TischinskiHappy Birthday to Tom Tischinski, who caught 82 games for the Minnesota Twins between 1969 and 1971.  I only faced Tom once, on August 19, 1970 at Metropolitan Stadium.  That was my All-Star year and I was working on my first (and only) 20-win season, so our 3-0 loss was a tough one.  The problem for me was that Jim Perry was also pitching, and 1970 was also the best season of his career – he won 24 games.  The Yankees couldn’t get anything going off the lesser known of the Perry Brothers; he pitched a four-hitter.  Tom was 0-for-3 against me that day, but two days later he hit the only Home Run off his career against future Yankee Casey Cox, then of the Washington Senators.

Happy Birthday, Rich Hand (and the story of Casey Cox’s trade)

Rich HandThis one will test your baseball memory: Happy Birthday to Rich Hand, who pitched for the Cleveland Indians, Texas Rangers and California Angels during a four-year career that went from 1970 to 1973.  Keep reading, since there is an obscure Yankee connection. I pitched against him once, on August 31, 1972 when the Rangers played us at Yankee Stadium.  Rich had the misfortune of playing for some weak teams (I know what that’s like) and he had some promise.  One year he had over 100 strikeouts.  He was a nice guy and I don’t mean to embarrass him when I say that the Yankees played great that day – memorable because Horace Clarke hit a Home Run that day, and Bobby Murcer hit a three-run homer.  Rich did strike me out once.  I pitched a complete game, five hits, and seven strikeouts – bringing my record to a mediocre 14-13.

And for extreme Yankee trivia buffs: After four innings, Ted Williams, who was managing the Rangers, brought in Casey Cox to pitch.  Casey gave up successive RBI doubles in the fifth to Horace Clarke and Bobby Murcer.  Then he settled down and pitched 1-2-3 innings in the sixth and seventh.  I must have impressed Lee McPhail, because before the day was over, Casey was a Yankee – he came over to us in a trade for another pitcher, Jim Roland.  Jim’s tenure with the Yankees lasted all of four months.

Happy Birthday, Casey Cox

Casey Cox Happy Birthday to Casey Cox, my Yankee teammate in 1972 and 1973.  We were part of the Class of 1966 of American League pitchers making their major league debut; he was with the Washington Senators.  The first time we pitched against each other was on July 8, 1966 at Yankee Stadium, the second game of a twilight doubleheader.  This wasn’t exactly a battle of the titans; it was a match up of two fairly crappy teams; the ’72 Yankees were in 8th place, 19 ½ games out, and the Senators were in 9th, 21 ½ games out.

I had given up two runs in the first (including a double to Ken Harrelson and a triple to Frank Howard) and two more in the second.  We picked up three runs in the third off Mickey Mantle’s Home Run, doubles by Joe Pepitone and Ray Barker, and a single by Horace Clarke.  Casey relieved Joe Hannan in the fifth inning after Mickey singled to left and Hector Lopez (pinch running for Mickey) moved to third on Joe Pepitone’s single.  Elston Howard came to bat and hit into a double play, but Hector scored and the game was tied 4-4.  With two outs, Ray hit a deep shot to center – for a moment I thought it was going out – but Don Lock caught it and the inning was over.  Casey pitched again in the sixth, a 1-2-3 inning.  I came up with two outs and Casey struck me out – not an amazing accomplishment, but memorable to me nonetheless since it was a tie game.  I’m glad Ralph Houk didn’t pinch hit for me.

The top of the seventh was no good for me.  Paul Casanova led off with a single, and moved to second on a beautiful sacrifice bunt by Ed Brinkman.  Gil Hodges, the Senators manager, pulled Casey so that Bob Saverine could pinch hit.  Good move.  Bob singled to center and Paul scored and we’re now losing 5-4.  But my team continued to come through.  The new Washington pitcher, Dick Bosman, walked Tom Tresh; Bobby Richardson got to first base on a fielding error by Brinkman, the shortstop, with Tommy moving to second.  Hector executed a pretty good sacrifice bunt, moving Tommy to third and Bobby to second.  Hodges called for an intentional walk to Pepitone, loading the bases.  Elston Howard popped up to first; then Ray Barker hit a two-out single, with Tommy and Bobby scoring.  Now we’re ahead 6-5.  We scored one more run in the eighth when Clete Boyer hit a leadoff triple and later scored.  Dick Bosman got the loss and I was now 8-5, with another complete game but just two strikeouts.

Casey came to the Yankees on August 31, 1973 in a trade for Jim Roland, ending Jim’s four-month career in pinstripes.  He was a very good guy who had the misfortune of pitching for some bad teams – he originally signed with the Reds; timing is everything in baseball.  I’m sorry to report that the Yankees lost all five games Casey pitched in, including an excruciating loss in a game I pitched against the Red Sox; the loss was entirely on me, not Casey.  In 1974, Casey pitched in one game – he entered in the sixth, with the Red Sox ahead 12-5, and gave up three runs in three innings.  The Yankees released him soon after that, and he never pitched in the major leagues again.

A few more things about the baseball career of Casey Cox: he was managed by three baseball greats – Gil Hodges, Ted Williams and Ralph Houk; he had his career year in 1969 when he was 12-7 with a 2.78 ERA, making 13 starts in 52 games; and some excellent hitters like Carlton Fisk and Rod Carew had .143 career batting averages against him.

The other thing I think about when I remember Casey Cox is that he wore #29 and if you follow Yankee history, you know that there is not much longevity associated with guys who wear #29 on the back of their pinstripes.  Of the 55 Yankees who have worn #29, the only one to last more than a few seasons were Francisco Cervelli, Mike Stanton, Gerald Williams, Catfish Hunter, and Charlie Silvera.  Casey originally wore #39, but he wanted #29, which was his number on the Senators and the Rangers.  That switch came about because Sudden Sam McDowell, who was #39, wanted #48.  Before Sudden Sam, the number was worn by a succession of one-season guys: Wade Blasingame (1972), Jim Hardin (1971), Mike McCormick (1970), Rocky Colavito (1968), Bill Henry (1966), Bobby Tiefenauer (1965), Mike Jurewicz (1965), Tom Metcalf (1963), Hal Brown (1962), Earl Torgeson (1961), Duke Maas (1961), and Hal Stowe (1960).  After Casey was traded, #29 was assigned to Tom Buskey, who wore it from April 1973 until April 1974, when he and I were traded to Cleveland; and then Dick Woodson for the rest of that season.  Then Catfish came in 1975.  Later came short-term Yankees like Dave Collins, Paul Zuvella, Al Holland, Luis Aquayo, Dave LaPoint, Mike Humphreys, Ricky Bones, Bubba Trammel, Tony Clark, Tim Redding, Felix Escalona, Octavio Dotel, Kei Igawa, Cody Ransom, Xavier Nady, Anthony Claggett, and Rafael Soriano.  So the best I can say is Good Luck to David Carpenter.