Tagged: California Angels

Happy Birthday, Rudy May

RUDY MAYHappy Birthday to Rudy May, who was a strong rival pitcher in the American League.  We just missed each other on the Yankees.  I was traded to Cleveland in April, 1974 and the California Angels sold him to the Yankees a little more than a month later.  Rudy played a key role in re-establishing the Yankee tradition in the George Steinbrenner Era; he won 15 games in 1975.  But poor Rudy got traded in the middle of the 1976 season in a blockbuster deal: Rick Dempsey, Tippy Martinez, Scott McGregor and Dave Pagan went to the Baltimore Orioles for Ken Holtzman, Elrod Hendricks, Doyle Alexander, Grant Jackson and Jimmy Freeman.

The first time I ever faced Rudy, it was a real pitcher’s duel.   It was May 6, 1969 at Anaheim Stadium.  Each of us gave up just one hit in the first three innings.  Billy Cowan hit a leadoff single in the top of the fourth and moved to second on Bobby Murcer’s hit.  But then Rudy struck out Roy White and Joe Pepitone, and ended the inning with Frank Fernandez’s pop-up.

We took a 2-0 lead in the fifth when Rudy walked Bill Robinson with one out.  I was the next batter, so that should have been out #2; I bunted, Bill got to second, and Rudy made a bad throw to Dick Stuart – so I was safe at first and Bill made it to third.  Horace Clarke got us our second out with a pop up.  I advanced to second when Rudy walked Billy.  The next batter was Bobby, who singled on the first pitch.  Bill scored, and then I scored on a weak throw from Jay Johnstone in center.  But with runners at second and third, Rudy got Roy White out to end the inning.  Rudy was pitching a great game with five strikeouts and no earned runs.  Bill Rigney took him out in the ninth after he gave up a leadoff walk to Tommy Tresh, and Andy Messersmith finished the game.

The Angeles scared me in the bottom of the ninth.  Bobby Knoop hit an infield single to lead of the inning, followed by another single from Bubba Morton.  Lou Johnson laid down a beautiful sacrifice bunt; with runners on second and third, Ralph Houk had me walk Jim Fregosi and pitch to Jay.  Jay hit a grounder to first, and Joe was able to get the Jim out at second — but it was enough to score Bobby.  Now I had a runners on second and third and the always threatening Rick Reichardt at bat.  Rick has been turning up in my posts a lot lately – and almost always with bad news for me.  But this time I got Rick out, and the Yankees won 2-1.  A great game for Rudy, who was quickly impressing the entire American League.

Happy Birthday, Eddie Fisher

Eddie Fisher CAHappy Birthday to Eddie Fisher, who was never married to Debbie Reynolds, Elizabeth Taylor or Connie Stevens, but did play fifteen years in the major leagues from 1959 to 1973 -– around the same time his namesake enjoyed so much success in Hollywood.  I remember watching Eddie as a starting pitcher for the White Sox when I was in college.  They first time I faced him as a pro ballplayer was on July 20, 1970 at Yankee Stadium.  He was with the California Angeles and came in to pitch the bottom of the seventh in relief after Andy Messersmith gave up a single to Roy White, an RBI double to Danny Cater, and a two-run homer to Curt Blefary.  I came up to bat with a runner on first and two out and hit a single to my old teammate Roger Repoz in left.  I pitched well – a three-hitter with five strikeouts and a complete game, but gave up a solo homer to Jim Spencer; the Yankees won 6-1.  I also recall pitching a nine-hit shutout against the Angeles and Rudy May and Eddie in 1971, and a four-hit shutout against the Angels in 1971 that Eddie pitched in.  Eddie left baseball with a respectable 85-70 record with a 3.41 career ERA.  I must admit there was a certain thrill pitching against a guy you used to watch as a kid.

Happy Birthday, Rich Hand (and the story of Casey Cox’s trade)

Rich HandThis one will test your baseball memory: Happy Birthday to Rich Hand, who pitched for the Cleveland Indians, Texas Rangers and California Angels during a four-year career that went from 1970 to 1973.  Keep reading, since there is an obscure Yankee connection. I pitched against him once, on August 31, 1972 when the Rangers played us at Yankee Stadium.  Rich had the misfortune of playing for some weak teams (I know what that’s like) and he had some promise.  One year he had over 100 strikeouts.  He was a nice guy and I don’t mean to embarrass him when I say that the Yankees played great that day – memorable because Horace Clarke hit a Home Run that day, and Bobby Murcer hit a three-run homer.  Rich did strike me out once.  I pitched a complete game, five hits, and seven strikeouts – bringing my record to a mediocre 14-13.

And for extreme Yankee trivia buffs: After four innings, Ted Williams, who was managing the Rangers, brought in Casey Cox to pitch.  Casey gave up successive RBI doubles in the fifth to Horace Clarke and Bobby Murcer.  Then he settled down and pitched 1-2-3 innings in the sixth and seventh.  I must have impressed Lee McPhail, because before the day was over, Casey was a Yankee – he came over to us in a trade for another pitcher, Jim Roland.  Jim’s tenure with the Yankees lasted all of four months.