Tagged: Boston Red Sox

Happy Birthday, Mike Andrews

Mike AndrewsHappy Birthday to Mike Andrews, who enjoyed a nice career as the Second Baseman for the Boston Red Sox and Chicago White Sox during the time that I was pitching for the Yankees.  Mike hit .308 against me during his eight years in Major League Baseball.  He had 11 RBI’s off me, more than any other pitcher he faced.  Of all the hitters I faced during my eleven seasons as an American League pitcher, only six of them hit more RBI’ off me than Mike: Brooks Robinson, Paul Blair, Boog Powell, Harmon Killebrew, Al Kaline and Bob Oliver.

The first time I faced Mike was on September 24, 1966 – less than a week after he was called up from the minors.  It was his third major league game, the second at Yankee Stadium.  I wrote about this game recently on Rico Petrocelli’s birthday.  Mike went 1-for-3 off me that day, with a one-out single to left.  He got left on base.  Even though I joined the Yankees as a rookie at the start of the 1966 season, this was the first time I had faced our bitter rival, the Red Sox. This was a real unexciting pitchers dual between me and Jim Lonborg (who would win the AL Cy Young Award the next season. I gave up six hits – three of them to Reggie Smith – no runs, and struck out seven. Jim pitched a four-hitter, giving up one run after giving up hits to Mike Hegan and Horace Clarke, with Bobby Murcer driving in the one run of the game with a ground out to second. The other memorable moment was that I hit a ground-rule double in the bottom of the eighth.

After his career ended, Mike went on to have a remarkable second act as Chairman of the Jimmy Fund of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, where he has worked to raise hundreds of millions of dollars for cancer research and treatment.  What Mike has accomplished in his life is truly incredible, and he is a hero to everyone associated with the game of baseball.

Monument Monday: Steve Hamilton and the Folly Floater

Steve HamiltonSteve Hamilton is still remembered for his Folly Floater pitch, and his Yankee teammates will never forget the time he swallowed some of his chewing tobacco and threw up on the mount.  Abby came to the Yankees in a 1963 trade with the Washington Senators, so he was there when I made the team in 1966.  We met at spring training.  We were Yankee pitchers together until the last month of the 1970 season, when the let him go and the White Sox claimed him off the waiver list.  We had fun together, were friends off the field, and stayed in touch until he passed away of colon cancer at the young age of 63.    One of the coolest facts about Abby is that he also played in the NBA for two or three years; I think only two guys have ever played in both a World Series and in the NBA finals.  The dude was 6’6.  I remember that Carl Yastrzemski couldn’t hit Abby; he had a career .143 batting average against him.  If I had to pick one guy to get out, it would have been the best player for our biggest rival.

There was one game in 1970 against the Red Sox that I remember well because I was the starting pitcher.  It was June 21 at Fenway Park.  We were in 2nd place in the AL East, 3 game behind the Orioles, and I was having the best season of my career – soon afterwards, I would be named for the first (and only) time to the American League All-Star team.   The game started off well enough, a 1-2-3 first inning.  But in the bottom of the second, I wasn’t throwing well.  Tony Conigliaro led off with a single, and moved to third on a one-out single by George Scott.  I struck Billy Conigliaro out, but then Jerry Moses hit an RBI single. Then George scored on a single by the Red Sox pitcher, Gary Peters.  Jerry scored off a single by Mike Andrews.  We were down 3-1.  Yaz led off the third with a single and Ralph Houk had enough.  I was out, Ron Klimkowski was in.  The lead bounced back and forth a few times.  The Major pulled Ron in the sixth for Abby, who walked Yaz; then Jack Aker came in to pitch.  Long story short, Yankees won 14-10 in an 11-inning game.  Bobby Murcer led us to victory, robbing Yaz of a Home Run in the eighth with an incredible catch, and a key double in the top of the eleventh.

(OK, I have to make a full disclosure here: You may be wondering why I wrote about a game where Abby pitched to one batter and walked him in a post about Abby.  I started writing about the 6/21/70 Red Sox game because I thought it was the one Abby won for us.  But I had it wrong.  But I figured any story that ends with Bobby Murcer robbing Carl Yastrzemski of a Home Run, followed by an extra-inning RBI double ought not become the victim of the delete key.  Fair enough?)

Here are the ones I should have led with: two 1970 games against the Brewers at Yankee Stadium.  On May 2, I started the game and had a 4-0 lead going into the sixth inning.  John Kennedy, a former Yankee, led off with a single to center.  I struck out Rich Rollins, walked Tommy Harper, and John scored on Ted Kubiak’s single.  I struck out Ted Savage; then Kubiak stole second and Tommy stole third.  I walked Danny Walton, loading the bases.  Mike Hershberger hit a two-run single to center, and The Major brought in Lindy McDaniel to pitch.  I left the game with a 4-3 lead.   Milwaukee scored two runs off Lindy and Jack Aker in the eighth, putting them ahead 5-4.   Jerry McNertney hit a leadoff homer against Joe Verbanic in the ninth (6-4) and then loaded the bases with two walks and a single.  The Major brought in Abby, who struck out the next two batters to end the inning.  This game ends the way I like them to end: Bobby Murcer hit a two-run homer in the bottom of the ninth to tie the game, and with runners on first and second, Thurman Munson hit a walk-off single to win the game.  Abby got the win.

The next day, May 3, the first game of a Sunday afternoon doubleheader, starter Bill Burbach and reliever Ron Klimkowski gave up a combined 5 runs in the first three innings.  The lead bounced back and forth for a while and in the sixth, with the Brewers ahead 6-5, Abby came in to pitch.  He gave up another run after Kennedy doubled, Bob Meyer bunted him to third, and Tommy Harper got an RBI sacrifice fly.  The Yankee offense came through for Abby in the bottom of the sixth   Bobby Murcer led off with a single, but got forced at second by Roy White’s ground out.  Heeba scored on Danny Cater’s single to left.  Then Thurman Munson came in as a pinch hitter for Jake Gibbs and tripled, scoring Danny.  That was followed by Gene Michael’s double, scoring Tugboat.  Abby ended the inning with a pop up to the shortstop, nut the Yankees now had an 8-7 lead.

I think this part is important: the fact that The Major let Abby hit with a runner on second and a one-run lead is a testament to Abby’s pitching.  He was doing well, and they weren’t going to risk taking him out.  Abby did not disappoint: he got out of the seventh unbruised, with just one base runner on a walk; he had a 1-2-3 eighth.  And he won the game in the ninth with another 1-2-3 inning.  It was great pitching – for the second time in two days.

Watch Abby’s Folly Floater: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WFvp7kMraAw

Happy Birthday, Kerry Dineen

Happy Birthday to Kerry Dineen, who played the outfield for the Yankees ever so briefly in 1975 and 1976.  While I missed playing with Kerry on the Yankees, I remember him from my last spring training in Fort Lauderdale in 1974 and he was impressive.  The Yankees were high on him as a prospect.  He got called up for a few games in 1975 when Elliot Maddox got hurt, and – I looked it up – he hit .364 playing in seven games over a six day period.  I don’t know why he didn’t get a September call-up.   But in Cleveland, a week before I was traded to Texas, I paid attention to Kerry’s big game because my friend Thurman Munson was playing left field.

It’s a good story.  The Yankees were on their way to George Steinbrenner’s first pennant. On May 20, 1976, the Yankees and the Red Sox had a brawl, and Mickey Rivers and Lou Piniella got hurt in the fight; with Maddox and Ron Blomberg already on the DL, it left Billy Martin with a shortage of outfielders to play the next day.  The way I heard it, Kerry was actually taking batting practice in Syracuse when he got a call telling him that needed him in the Bronx in time for the 8 PM game.  The Yankees started Roy White in center, Thurman in left, and Oscar Gamble in right.  (Fran Healy was catching, in case you are wondering.)  Billy used Rick Dempsey to pinch hit for Oscar, and Rick wound up playing right for a bit.

The Yankees were behind by a run going into the bottom of the ninth and they rallied.  Otto Velez pinch hit for Jim Mason and hit leadoff double and came out of the game so Sandy Alomar could run for him.  Successive sacrifice flies by Willie Randolph and Roy White brought Alomar home, tying the game at 4-4.    Dempsey got a hit in the tenth and Billy put Kerry in to run for him.

In the bottom of the twelfth, Kerry came up to bat with two outs and runners on second and third.  He did a walk-off single and the Yankees won 5-4.  It was his moment, but it didn’t last.  He played four games for the Yankees that spring and never wore pinstripes again.  After the season was over, he was traded to the Phillies for some guy Sergio Ferrer.  Anyone ever hear of him?

The other good story is that not long after Kerry got sent back to the minors in 1975, the Yankees brought up a promising young pitcher named Ron Guidry.  Gator got Kerry’s uniform, #49.

Here’s a photo of Thurman Munson playing Left Field against the Red Sox on May 21, 1976.  Thurman almost robbed Jim Rice of a Home Run; instead, it was a double.  Thurman could do it all!

Elston Howard’s second act

Something a lot of people forget about the magnificent Elston Howard was that in 1967, after breaking up a kid’s no-hitter with two outs and two strikes in the bottom of the ninth, and after the brawl and all the other stuff that went on between the two teams, Ellie got traded to the Red Sox in early August and helped Boston win the American League pennant that year. The Yankees got a player to be named later; it turned out to be a pitcher named Ron Klimkowski. I’m glad that Ellie got to play in one last World Series; he was the starting catcher for six of the games (and played in all seven), and in Game 5 he got a key hit and RBI. His 1961 teammate, Roger Maris, played for the St. Louis Cardinals.

In his first game at Yankee Stadium not in pinstripes, he got an RBI in a close game. I didn’t face Ellie until his last season in the major leagues, 1968. It was May 12, 1968 at Yankee Stadium, and Ralph Houk brought me in to pitch in the third inning after Bill Monbouquette had given up five runs in the first two innings, and three successive singles in the third. I faced Ellie in the fifth and he singled to center off me. Six days later at Fenway Park, the Major pulled Fred Talbot for a pinch hitter in the sixth and then I came in to pitch. I got the first two batters out, then Ellie came up to bat. He hit an infield single. So after two games, and two at-bats, Elston Howard retired with a 1.000 batting average against me. After he retired, he came the Yankee First Base coach. Sweetest guy ever.

The legend of Billy Rohr

From the Red Sox “Impossible Dream” season, another Yankees vs. Red Sox game I remember vividly was our home opener on April 14, 1967. A 22-year-old pitcher named Billy Rohr was making his major league debut. I played against Billy in the AA Carolina League in 1965, when I was with Greensboro and he was with Winston-Salem, but fifty years later, I can’t say that I recall any came where we pitched against each other. Billy was magical; it was something out of Hollywood, almost like Billy Chapel in For Love of the Game, only in reverse. Billy Rohr entered the bottom of the ninth inning without giving up a hit – in his first big league came. Tommy Tresh led off and flied out to left, and then Joe Pepitone flied out to left. He was one out away from a no-hitter and was facing Elston Howard. Ellie hit a two-strike single to right to break up the no-hitter. This was one amazing baseball game. The Red Sox won 3-0 and Billy got his first win, a one-hitter. Billy had a short career; the Red Sox traded him to Cleveland in 1968, and he spent most of the next few years in the minors. I heard he wound up going to law school. The other thing that resonated with me is how gracious Ellie was – no schadenfreude, just a great ballplayer doing his job. I don’t like losing, ever, but I couldn’t help feeling a little proud of a fellow young pitcher.

Happy Birthday, Rico Petrocelli

Happy Birthday to Rico Petrocelli, born in Brooklyn 72 years ago today. Even though I joined the Yankees as a rookie at the start of the 1966 season, Ralph Houk didn’t use me against the Red Sox until September 24, a match-up between an 8th place team and a 10th place team at Yankee Stadium. I looked it up and attendance that night was 5,897. This was the first time I faced Rico and got him out four times – three of them on infield pop ups. This was a real unexciting pitchers dual between me and Jim Lonborg (who would win the AL Cy Young Award the next season. I gave up six hits – three of them to Reggie Smith – no runs, and struck out seven. Jim pitched a four-hitter, giving up one run after giving up hits to Mike Hegan and Horace Clarke, with Bobby Murcer driving in the one run of the game with a ground out to second. The other memorable moment was that I hit a ground-rule double in the bottom of the eighth.

Some fans mark the genesis of the Yankees-Red Sox rivalry to the Babe Ruth trade, but for this kid from the suburbs of Chicago, it began on Wednesday, June 21, 1967 during a tough 8-1 loss at Yankee Stadium. Tempers were flaring. Our pitcher was Thad Tillotson and in the second inning he beaned Joe Foy, who had hit a Grand Slam Home Run against us the previous day, in the head. That was after he threw a pair of brush-back pitches at him. The next inning, Longborg beaned Tillotson, and players from both teams cleared their benches in defense of our teammates. It got exponentially worse when a verbal argument between Rico and Joe Pepitone turned into a real fight. I remember that Rico’s brother was working at Yankee Stadium as a security guard and he ran out on the field to help his brother. That was the year the Red Sox came from behind to win the American League pennant in what was called “The Impossible Dream.”

I didn’t know Rico well, but he was probably no Fritz Peterson fan: he went 9-for-54 against me, a career .167 average.