Tagged: Bob Oliver

Happy Birthday, Mike Hedlund

Mike HedlundHappy Birthday to Mike Hedlund, a pitcher for the Cleveland Indians in 1965 and 1968, and for the Kansas City Royals from 1969 to 1972. I faced him on August 21, 1971 at Municipal Stadium. We both pitched complete games, and we both gave up a lot of hits: ten by Mike and twelve by me. Mike have up a Home Run (to Ron Blomberg) and I gave up a Double (to Freddy Patek) and a Triple (to Lou Piniella). We were tied 3-3 going into the bottom of the eighth. Sweet Lou hit a one-out infield single to the third baseman, and made it to third of Jerry Kenney’s throwing error. Bob Oliver then singled to center and the Royals went ahead. In the top of the ninth, Mike got Felipe Alou (pinch hitting for Frank Baker), Jake Gibbs (pinch hitting for me) and Jerry out, 1-2-3, to win the game.

Happy Birthday, Mike Andrews

Mike AndrewsHappy Birthday to Mike Andrews, who enjoyed a nice career as the Second Baseman for the Boston Red Sox and Chicago White Sox during the time that I was pitching for the Yankees.  Mike hit .308 against me during his eight years in Major League Baseball.  He had 11 RBI’s off me, more than any other pitcher he faced.  Of all the hitters I faced during my eleven seasons as an American League pitcher, only six of them hit more RBI’ off me than Mike: Brooks Robinson, Paul Blair, Boog Powell, Harmon Killebrew, Al Kaline and Bob Oliver.

The first time I faced Mike was on September 24, 1966 – less than a week after he was called up from the minors.  It was his third major league game, the second at Yankee Stadium.  I wrote about this game recently on Rico Petrocelli’s birthday.  Mike went 1-for-3 off me that day, with a one-out single to left.  He got left on base.  Even though I joined the Yankees as a rookie at the start of the 1966 season, this was the first time I had faced our bitter rival, the Red Sox. This was a real unexciting pitchers dual between me and Jim Lonborg (who would win the AL Cy Young Award the next season. I gave up six hits – three of them to Reggie Smith – no runs, and struck out seven. Jim pitched a four-hitter, giving up one run after giving up hits to Mike Hegan and Horace Clarke, with Bobby Murcer driving in the one run of the game with a ground out to second. The other memorable moment was that I hit a ground-rule double in the bottom of the eighth.

After his career ended, Mike went on to have a remarkable second act as Chairman of the Jimmy Fund of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, where he has worked to raise hundreds of millions of dollars for cancer research and treatment.  What Mike has accomplished in his life is truly incredible, and he is a hero to everyone associated with the game of baseball.

Happy Birthday, Dick Drago

Happy Birthday Dick Drago, who made his major league debut for the first Kansas City Royals team in 1969 and won 11 games as a right-handed pitcher. He got to play for manager Joe Gordon, a Hall of Fame second baseman and Yankee legend, and with guys like Jim Campanis, Bob Oliver, and the 1969 AL Rookie of the Year, Lou Piniella. My Yankee teammates who went to the Royals in the expansion draft included Jim Rooker, Ellie Rodriguez, and Steve Whitaker, who got traded to the Seattle Pilots two weeks before opening day for Piniella. I didn’t get to face Dick until August 25, 1970, and only for an inning. Steve Kline pitched great for 7 1/3 innings and only let up one run – a seventh inning leadoff homer to Bob Oliver. After he gave up a hit in the eighth, and with a runner at second, Ralph Houk brought in Jack Aker to pitch to Amos Otis. Jack had a sore back and hadn’t pitched in about two weeks. He seemed to be doing fine, but after one pitch, the pain returned and he could not continue. Houk called me in to get the last two outs. Dick was pitching magnificently. He had given up a run in the second when Bobby Murcer doubled and Danny Cater drove him in, when he took the mound in the top of the ninth, we were tied, 1-1. Roy White singled, stole second, and advanced to third on Cater’s infield hit. Then Jim Lyttle drove him in with a single. I came in for the bottom of the ninth and gave up a leadoff walk to Oliver; the Major then brought in Lindy McDaniel to close, and the Yankees won 2-1. So Dick, who threw a complete game (and was great) got the loss, and I got the win by pitching to four batters. A hugely important win, by the way, because I finished the season 20-11.