Tagged: Bill Robinson

Happy Birthday, Rocky Colavito

ROcky Colavito batHappy Birthday to Rocky Colavito, whom I believe never put any curse on the Cleveland Indians.  Rocky was the first major leaguer I ever saw up close.  It was in April of 1963.  Dave Duncan and I were both prospects at the time and we were among a group of players invited to try out for the Kansas City Athletics.  We went out to eat, and a group of Detroit Tigers who were in town came to the same place for dinner.  Rocky was a Home Run hitting superstar in 1963 and was very recognizable, and I was in awe of him.    I never stopped, largely because he earned it; Rocky had a .391 career batting average when I was the pitcher.

The first time I pitched to Rocky was on June 7, 1966 at Cleveland Stadium.  Rocky hit a leadoff single to start the second inning.  And I remember the fourth inning well, because I struck out the side, including Rocky and Leon Wagner.  The Yankees won that game 7-2, the fourth win of my fledgling career, and I struck out nine batters.

Rocky became a Yankee at the end of his career.  The Dodgers had released him around the 1968 All-Star break and the Yankees signed him a few days later.  It was very cool when Rocky arrived in the clubhouse and put on the Pinstripes with #29 across his back.  And he was a Bronx-born guy and felt very comfortable playing in New York.  We were playing the Washington Senators at Yankee Stadium and Rocky was in the lineup, playing Right Field and batting sixth.  In his first At-Bat, he hit a deep fly ball that I thought might be a homer, but Del Unser caught it at the warning track.  The next time he came to the plate was in the bottom of the fifth. The pitcher was Joe Coleman.  It was still a scoreless game, but the Yankees had something going: Joe Pepitone hit a leadoff single, and moved to second on Andy Kosco’s hit.  Rocky hit a Home Run, the 370th of his career and his first in Pinstripes.   I was pitching the day Rocky hit the last Home Run of his great career, on September 24, 1968 against the Cleveland Indians.

The other story to tell when talking about Rocky as a Yankee was the time he pitched.  He was 35-years-old and near the end of his career on August 25, 1968, the first game of a Sunday doubleheader against his old team, the Detroit Tigers.  Future Yankee Pat Dobson was on the mound for the Tigers. s Ralph Houk was short on pitchers and was trying not to go to his closers until the end of the game.  Detroit had taken a 5-0 lead when The Major pulled Steve Barber and turned to Rocky, who entered the game with one out and runners on first and second.  Rocky got Al Kaline and Willie Horton out to end the inning.  Rocky came back to pitch the fifth and sixth innings.  He walked two in the fifth, but gave up no hits and no runs.  In the sixth, he gave up a double to Al Kaline, who was left stranded; he even struck out Dick Tracewski.

But wait, there’s more.  In the bottom of the sixth, the Yankees took the lead, 6-5, off Home Runs by Bill Robinson and Bobby Cox.  Rocky walked and scored the go-ahead run on Jake Gibbs’ single.  The Major brought in Dooley Womack and Lindy McDaniel to finish the game, and Rocky got the win.  One hit, no runs, and a strikeout.  And in the second game, Rocky played Right Field and hit a Home Run off Mickey Lolich; the Yankees won 5-4 and swept the doubleheader.

Happy Birthday, Jim Miles

Jim MilesHappy Birthday to Jim Miles, a pitcher for the Washington Senators for three games in 1968 and ten in 1969. I pitched against Jim once, on April 15, 1969 at Yankee Stadium. Jim came in to pitch the bottom of the eighth inning and gave up a leadoff single to Joe Pepitone. Then he struck out Gene Michael. Bill Robinson reached first on Third Baseman Ken McMullen’s error. With runners on first and second, Jake Gibbs hit a grounder to Second Baseman Tim Cullen, forcing Bill at second. Now there were runners at first and second, two out, and I was the batter. I grounded out. The Yankee offense came through that day – Bobby Murcer and Joe Pepitone homered – and we won 8-2. It was my first win of the 1969 season.

Happy Birthday, Andy Messersmith

Andy MessersmithHappy Birthday to former Yankee pitcher Andy Messersmith, who is 70 today. Bluto was a great pitcher, and his challenge to the reserve clause helped pave the way for ballplayers to determine their own destiny. I was gone by the time free agency came to be, but I sure remember Bluto as a dominating pitcher for the California Angels, and later for the Los Angeles Dodgers. I was the Yankees starting pitcher on August 12, 1968, the first time Bluto pitched against the team he rooted for as a kid in Toms River, New Jersey. I gave up a run in the second, and we took the lead off Mickey Mantle’s two-run homer in the sixth. Rick Reichardt tied it up with a sacrifice fly in the bottom of the sixth. With the score still tied 2-2 in the bottom of the eighth, Ralph Houk brought in Lindy McDaniel to pitch after I surrendered two-out singles to Jim Fregosi and to Rick. In the ninth, Bill Robinson hit a leadoff double, and moved to third when Tommy Tresh bunted safely. With the score tied, no outs, and runners on first and third, Bill Rigney pulled starter George Brunet and brought Bluto in to pitch. Bluto have up an RBI single to Jake Gibbs, putting us ahead, 3-2. He got Bobby Cox to fly out to Don Mincher at first, and struck out Lindy. Then Roy White drove Tommy home with a single. That was it for Bluto. We won 5-2.

I pitched against him again during his first visit to Yankee Stadium two weeks later. It was a Monday night doubleheader and I started the first game against Dennis Bennett. We fell behind in the fourth when that Reichardt guy hit an RBI single for the first run of the game. I tied it up in the bottom of the inning when I hit a sacrifice fly to Rick in left, scoring Tommy. We took the lead in the sixth when Dick Howser hit a two-out double, scoring Bobby Cox. That’s when Andy came in to pitch. He got Bill Robinson out to end the inning. The Mick led off the seventh with a single, and moved to second on Heeba’s single. Andy Kosco bunted The Mick to third and Heeba to second. Bluto struck out Tommy, but then gave up a two-RBI double to Frank Fernandez. After walking Bobby intentionally, I got up to bad with two outs and runners on first and second. I belted a double past that Reichardt guy, scoring Frank and Bobby. We won 6-2.

In the second game, which I got to see most of — The Major didn’t believe in sending guys home early – starter Bill Harrelson loaded the bases and with two out, Andy came in to pitch again. Mickey Mantle came up to pinch hit for Charley Smith, and Bluto struck him out. We lost that game; Andy got the save.

Happy Birthday, Vida Blue

Vida BlueHappy Birthday to Vida Blue, a six-time All-Star who pitched in the major leagues for seventeen years and won the American League Cy Young and MVP in 1971. He was an amazing southpaw and I always enjoyed watching him pitch – except when he was up against me. I remember the first time I saw him. It was July 29, 1969 at the Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum. This was his second major league game and he was starting against Stan Bahnsen. He pitched perfect baseball for the first three innings. He gave up a double to Bill Robinson in the fourth and a single to Bobby Murcer in the fifth, but otherwise the Yankees were having trouble hitting this guy. He gave up two hits and two runs in the sixth, and no hits in the seventh. In the eighth, Vida walked Robinson and then have up a Home Run to Joe Pepitone. That put the Yankees ahead, 4-3. The A’s came back in the eighth, with a single by Rick Monday, a triple by Ramon Webster and a single by Bob Johnson to take a 6-4 lead.

I remember another game during the summer of 1971, a real pitcher’s duel between Vida and Mel Stottlemyre. Both of them pitched complete games. Vida had ten strikeouts, Mel pitched a three-hitter. The Yankees scored one run in the first, off a single by Thurman Munson and a double by Roy White; Tugboat scored on a ground out by Felipe Alou, and the Yankees won it 1-0.

The four times Frank Robinson almost became a Yankee

Frank RobinsonOne Hall of Famer that eluded the New York Yankees was Frank Robinson, despite repeated attempts to get him in pinstripes. As early as 1965, the Cincinnati Reds were shopping this superstar at winter meetings. My understanding was that the Reds owner thought Robby was an “old 30” and that his body would not withstand much more of a baseball career. He was anxious to trade him while the value remained high. There was talk that the Reds had offered him to the Astros for Jimmy Wynn and a relief pitcher named Claude Raymond, but that Houston turned them down. The Yankee deal I heard about – I had just finished by third year in the minor leagues at the time – was that the Yankees would send and Joe Pepitone to the Reds for Robby and pitcher Jim O’Toole. A couple of weeks later, the Yankees traded catcher Doc Edwards to the Cleveland Indians for Lou Clinton and that seemed to end their search for a power-hitting outfielder. Maybe it was a metaphor for the Horace Clarke Era. The Reds did trade Robby, to Baltimore for Milt Pappas, Jack Baldschun and Dick Simpson. Robby won the Triple Crown in his first season with the Orioles.

After winning three AL pennants with Robby and the 1970 World Series, the Orioles put him on the trading block again. The Yankees tried to put a deal together. The problem, I was told, was that Harry Dalton wanted Mel Stottlemyre or me. Mel was the ace of the staff and I was the #2 pitcher coming off a 20-win season. Lee McPhail countered with Stan Bahnsen, and the Dalton wanted Steve Kline and Mike Kekich too. The Yankees were unwilling to decimate their pitching staff for one superstar outfielder.

Apparently the Mets were in a similar situation. The Orioles wanted Tom Seaver for Frank Robinson, straight up, and the Mets said no. The counter from Baltimore was at least two other pitchers from a list that included Jerry Koosman, Nolan Ryan, Jon Matlack, Tug McGraw, and Gary Gentry – and they Danny Frisella. The Mets said no to that too.

Most players followed the winter meetings carefully, because you never knew what would happen and how it might affect your life. But the Yankees, still owned by CBS – the George Steinbrenner Era was still a few years away – didn’t do much after they traded Bill Robinson for Barry Moore. The Washington Senators offered Frank Howard for cash the Yankees didn’t have, and the Cleveland Indians were shopping star pitcher Sudden Sam McDowell, but they apparently wanted a lot of cash too. The Boss would have had them both in pinstripes.

In 1971, after losing the AL pennant to the Oakland A’s, the Orioles traded Robby to the Los Angeles Dodgers for a group of prospects that included future Yankee Doyle Alexander. The Orioles had Don Baylor and Terry Crowley coming up and wanted to give them more playing time. And Robby was making what was then a huge salary – about $125,000 – and they wanted to unload the expense. The Yankees had shown interest in him then, but they got busy making the “blockbuster deal” that sent Bahnsen to the White Sox for Rich McKinney and missed out. After the 1972 season, the Dodgers traded Robby to the California Angeles, in what really was a blockbuster trade: the Dodgers sent Robby and Bill Singer, an excellent pitcher, to the California Angeles for pitcher Andy Messersmith, Bobby Valentine and Ken McMullen.

After the Boss bought the Yankees and brought Gabe Paul over as the GM – and after Charlie Finley refused to allow the Yankees to hire Dick Williams as their manager — there was some serious talk about hiring Robby to become baseball’s first black manager. Mr. Paul had been GM in Cincinnati when Robby was the NL Rookie of the Year and MVP, and was a huge Frank Robinson fan.

The fourth chance for the Yankees to see Frank Robinson in pinstripes came in June of 1974, when he was again on the trading block. Mr. Paul had been negotiating a deal with the Angels that I recall would have brought Robby and Rudy May to the Yankees for Roy White, Bill Sudakis and Dick Woodson. What I heard was that Robby’s contract gave him the right to veto a deal, and when the Yankees refused to pay about $35,000 in relocation expenses, Robby vetoed the trade. That was just a couple of days before I was traded to the Cleveland Indians, where Robby would soon become my teammate and my manager.

You can’t live life on a bunch of what ifs, like how my career would have been different if I has been pitching for a contending team like the Orioles. But I’ll tell you this: I met my soulmate while playing in New York, I got to play with Boog Powell anyway in Cleveland, and I wouldn’t trade my years with the Yankees for anything.

Happy Birthday, Rudy May

RUDY MAYHappy Birthday to Rudy May, who was a strong rival pitcher in the American League.  We just missed each other on the Yankees.  I was traded to Cleveland in April, 1974 and the California Angels sold him to the Yankees a little more than a month later.  Rudy played a key role in re-establishing the Yankee tradition in the George Steinbrenner Era; he won 15 games in 1975.  But poor Rudy got traded in the middle of the 1976 season in a blockbuster deal: Rick Dempsey, Tippy Martinez, Scott McGregor and Dave Pagan went to the Baltimore Orioles for Ken Holtzman, Elrod Hendricks, Doyle Alexander, Grant Jackson and Jimmy Freeman.

The first time I ever faced Rudy, it was a real pitcher’s duel.   It was May 6, 1969 at Anaheim Stadium.  Each of us gave up just one hit in the first three innings.  Billy Cowan hit a leadoff single in the top of the fourth and moved to second on Bobby Murcer’s hit.  But then Rudy struck out Roy White and Joe Pepitone, and ended the inning with Frank Fernandez’s pop-up.

We took a 2-0 lead in the fifth when Rudy walked Bill Robinson with one out.  I was the next batter, so that should have been out #2; I bunted, Bill got to second, and Rudy made a bad throw to Dick Stuart – so I was safe at first and Bill made it to third.  Horace Clarke got us our second out with a pop up.  I advanced to second when Rudy walked Billy.  The next batter was Bobby, who singled on the first pitch.  Bill scored, and then I scored on a weak throw from Jay Johnstone in center.  But with runners at second and third, Rudy got Roy White out to end the inning.  Rudy was pitching a great game with five strikeouts and no earned runs.  Bill Rigney took him out in the ninth after he gave up a leadoff walk to Tommy Tresh, and Andy Messersmith finished the game.

The Angeles scared me in the bottom of the ninth.  Bobby Knoop hit an infield single to lead of the inning, followed by another single from Bubba Morton.  Lou Johnson laid down a beautiful sacrifice bunt; with runners on second and third, Ralph Houk had me walk Jim Fregosi and pitch to Jay.  Jay hit a grounder to first, and Joe was able to get the Jim out at second — but it was enough to score Bobby.  Now I had a runners on second and third and the always threatening Rick Reichardt at bat.  Rick has been turning up in my posts a lot lately – and almost always with bad news for me.  But this time I got Rick out, and the Yankees won 2-1.  A great game for Rudy, who was quickly impressing the entire American League.

The James P. Dawson Award

I enjoy how easy it is to go off on a tangent when talking about Yankee history. In referencing Bill Robinson’s win of the 1967 James P. Dawson Award for the outstanding Yankee rookie in spring training, I thought about my own rookie year. The 1966 award went to Roy White, who deserved it. Just like I recollect games and the pitches I throw, I remember the number of votes I got. I’m going to keep the number to myself, but I will let you know there were 9 reporters who voted, Heeba got 7 votes and Bobby Murcer got two.

I was proud of Heeba and Weaser on getting the award, which continues to be considered quite prestigious in the Yankee world. I felt especially good when Mike Ferraro won it in 1968 because I knew how hard Stump took being cut from the team the year before. Jerry Kenney, my teammate at the AA Shelby Yankees, shared the award in 1969, and Johnny Ellis (not Thurman Munson) got it in 1970. The reporters sort of validated my Horace Clark Era theory in 1971 when they declined to give the award to anyone. Rusty Torres won in 1972, Otto Velez in 1973, and Tom Buskey in 1974 – a few weeks before he was traded to the Indians along with Steve Kline, Freddy Beene and me. Bluto died way too young in a car accident; he was 51.