Tagged: Andy Kosco

Happy Birthday, Rocky Colavito

ROcky Colavito batHappy Birthday to Rocky Colavito, whom I believe never put any curse on the Cleveland Indians.  Rocky was the first major leaguer I ever saw up close.  It was in April of 1963.  Dave Duncan and I were both prospects at the time and we were among a group of players invited to try out for the Kansas City Athletics.  We went out to eat, and a group of Detroit Tigers who were in town came to the same place for dinner.  Rocky was a Home Run hitting superstar in 1963 and was very recognizable, and I was in awe of him.    I never stopped, largely because he earned it; Rocky had a .391 career batting average when I was the pitcher.

The first time I pitched to Rocky was on June 7, 1966 at Cleveland Stadium.  Rocky hit a leadoff single to start the second inning.  And I remember the fourth inning well, because I struck out the side, including Rocky and Leon Wagner.  The Yankees won that game 7-2, the fourth win of my fledgling career, and I struck out nine batters.

Rocky became a Yankee at the end of his career.  The Dodgers had released him around the 1968 All-Star break and the Yankees signed him a few days later.  It was very cool when Rocky arrived in the clubhouse and put on the Pinstripes with #29 across his back.  And he was a Bronx-born guy and felt very comfortable playing in New York.  We were playing the Washington Senators at Yankee Stadium and Rocky was in the lineup, playing Right Field and batting sixth.  In his first At-Bat, he hit a deep fly ball that I thought might be a homer, but Del Unser caught it at the warning track.  The next time he came to the plate was in the bottom of the fifth. The pitcher was Joe Coleman.  It was still a scoreless game, but the Yankees had something going: Joe Pepitone hit a leadoff single, and moved to second on Andy Kosco’s hit.  Rocky hit a Home Run, the 370th of his career and his first in Pinstripes.   I was pitching the day Rocky hit the last Home Run of his great career, on September 24, 1968 against the Cleveland Indians.

The other story to tell when talking about Rocky as a Yankee was the time he pitched.  He was 35-years-old and near the end of his career on August 25, 1968, the first game of a Sunday doubleheader against his old team, the Detroit Tigers.  Future Yankee Pat Dobson was on the mound for the Tigers. s Ralph Houk was short on pitchers and was trying not to go to his closers until the end of the game.  Detroit had taken a 5-0 lead when The Major pulled Steve Barber and turned to Rocky, who entered the game with one out and runners on first and second.  Rocky got Al Kaline and Willie Horton out to end the inning.  Rocky came back to pitch the fifth and sixth innings.  He walked two in the fifth, but gave up no hits and no runs.  In the sixth, he gave up a double to Al Kaline, who was left stranded; he even struck out Dick Tracewski.

But wait, there’s more.  In the bottom of the sixth, the Yankees took the lead, 6-5, off Home Runs by Bill Robinson and Bobby Cox.  Rocky walked and scored the go-ahead run on Jake Gibbs’ single.  The Major brought in Dooley Womack and Lindy McDaniel to finish the game, and Rocky got the win.  One hit, no runs, and a strikeout.  And in the second game, Rocky played Right Field and hit a Home Run off Mickey Lolich; the Yankees won 5-4 and swept the doubleheader.

Happy Birthday, Andy Messersmith

Andy MessersmithHappy Birthday to former Yankee pitcher Andy Messersmith, who is 70 today. Bluto was a great pitcher, and his challenge to the reserve clause helped pave the way for ballplayers to determine their own destiny. I was gone by the time free agency came to be, but I sure remember Bluto as a dominating pitcher for the California Angels, and later for the Los Angeles Dodgers. I was the Yankees starting pitcher on August 12, 1968, the first time Bluto pitched against the team he rooted for as a kid in Toms River, New Jersey. I gave up a run in the second, and we took the lead off Mickey Mantle’s two-run homer in the sixth. Rick Reichardt tied it up with a sacrifice fly in the bottom of the sixth. With the score still tied 2-2 in the bottom of the eighth, Ralph Houk brought in Lindy McDaniel to pitch after I surrendered two-out singles to Jim Fregosi and to Rick. In the ninth, Bill Robinson hit a leadoff double, and moved to third when Tommy Tresh bunted safely. With the score tied, no outs, and runners on first and third, Bill Rigney pulled starter George Brunet and brought Bluto in to pitch. Bluto have up an RBI single to Jake Gibbs, putting us ahead, 3-2. He got Bobby Cox to fly out to Don Mincher at first, and struck out Lindy. Then Roy White drove Tommy home with a single. That was it for Bluto. We won 5-2.

I pitched against him again during his first visit to Yankee Stadium two weeks later. It was a Monday night doubleheader and I started the first game against Dennis Bennett. We fell behind in the fourth when that Reichardt guy hit an RBI single for the first run of the game. I tied it up in the bottom of the inning when I hit a sacrifice fly to Rick in left, scoring Tommy. We took the lead in the sixth when Dick Howser hit a two-out double, scoring Bobby Cox. That’s when Andy came in to pitch. He got Bill Robinson out to end the inning. The Mick led off the seventh with a single, and moved to second on Heeba’s single. Andy Kosco bunted The Mick to third and Heeba to second. Bluto struck out Tommy, but then gave up a two-RBI double to Frank Fernandez. After walking Bobby intentionally, I got up to bad with two outs and runners on first and second. I belted a double past that Reichardt guy, scoring Frank and Bobby. We won 6-2.

In the second game, which I got to see most of — The Major didn’t believe in sending guys home early – starter Bill Harrelson loaded the bases and with two out, Andy came in to pitch again. Mickey Mantle came up to pinch hit for Charley Smith, and Bluto struck him out. We lost that game; Andy got the save.

In a way, Andy Kosco changed my life

I wrote in my book that Andy Kosco looked exactly like Clark Kent in pinstripes.  For ten years, he was an outfielder for the Twins, Brewers, Angels, Reds, Dodgers and Red Sox, and hopefully I won’t don’t sound arrogant when I say this, but I didn’t mind pitching to him.  He had a .179 career batting average against me.  There were a couple of times when I felt differently, like a leadoff double in Milwaukee that wound up costing me a run, or a sacrifice fly at Anaheim Stadium that drove in a run.  And in 29 plate appearances, I was only able to strike him our once.  The Twins sold Andy to Oakland after the 1967 season, and the following month he came to the Yankees under the Rule 5 Draft.  His one season with the Yankees would have a historic meaning, at least to me.  I remember he appeared in the first game I pitched of the 1968 season, against the A’s and Catfish Hunter at Yankee Stadium.   Reggie Jackson homered off me, but I still had a 3-1 lead in the top of the eighth when I gave up a leadoff single to Bert Campanaris, who moved to second on Reggie’s single.  Ralph Houk took me out, and Dooley Womack came in relief.  Campy wound up scoring when Sal Bando grounded out, and we lost the game in the ninth when Dooley gave up a two-run homer to a pinch hitter named Floyd Robinson.  We lost 4-3.  Andy achieved a small footnote in baseball history on September 28, 1968 when he replaced Mickey Mantle at first base after The Mick had his last major league at-bat.  And Andy Kosco played a major role in my life on December 4, 1968 when the Yankees traded him to the Dodgers for a pitcher named Mike Kekich.